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An Analysis of Asymmetric Demand Response to Price Changes: The Case of Local Telephone Calls

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  • Bidwell, Miles O, Jr
  • Wang, Bruce X
  • Zona, J Douglas

Abstract

Asymmetric demand responses to price changes are not an observable implication of classical demand theory, which predicts that consumers will react to a small price increase in much the same way as they do to a small price decrease. Yet applied researchers have long speculated that consumers are more sensitive to price increases than they are to price decreases. In addition, recent empirical studies generally support the theory of asymmetric demand responses. We construct a dynamic model based on data gathered from monthly telephone bills for 128 New York Telephone customers over a five-year period. Our results support the conclusion that customers react more quickly and strongly when prices go up than they do when prices go down. Copyright 1995 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Bidwell, Miles O, Jr & Wang, Bruce X & Zona, J Douglas, 1995. "An Analysis of Asymmetric Demand Response to Price Changes: The Case of Local Telephone Calls," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 285-298, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:8:y:1995:i:3:p:285-98
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    Cited by:

    1. Sibly, Hugh, 2002. "Loss averse customers and price inflexibility," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 521-538, August.
    2. Briglauer Wolfgang & Götz Georg & Schwarz Anton, 2011. "Margin Squeeze in Fixed-Network Telephony Markets -- Competitive or Anticompetitive?," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(4), pages 1-21, December.
    3. Ahrens, Steffen & Pirschel, Inske & Snower, Dennis J., 2017. "A theory of price adjustment under loss aversion," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 78-95.
    4. Wadud, Zia, 2015. "Imperfect reversibility of air transport demand: Effects of air fare, fuel prices and price transmission," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 16-26.
    5. Mongkolporn, Veerasak & Yin, Xiangkang, 2005. "How does the entry of new firms change demand? An empirical estimation for a Thai telecommunications company," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 688-703, August.
    6. Wadud, Zia, 2014. "The asymmetric effects of income and fuel price on air transport demand," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 92-102.
    7. Woods, James, 2008. "What people do when they say they are conserving electricity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1945-1956, June.

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