IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/regeco/v27y2005i3p235-262.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

24/7 Hourly Response to Electricity Real-Time Pricing with up to Eight Summers of Experience

Author

Listed:
  • Thomas Taylor

    ()

  • Peter Schwarz

    ()

  • James Cochell

    ()

Abstract

This paper provides hourly own and cross price elasticities for industrial customers with up to 8 years of experience on Duke Power optional real-time rates. We include the effects of customer characteristics and temperature conditions. Aggregated results show larger own elasticities than have previous studies, complementarity within the potential peak hours and substitution in the late evening. As customers gain experience with hourly pricing, they show larger load reductions during higher priced hours. As compared to a TOU rate, net benefits are $14,000 per customer per month, approximately 4% of the average customer’s bill, and much greater than metering costs. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Taylor & Peter Schwarz & James Cochell, 2005. "24/7 Hourly Response to Electricity Real-Time Pricing with up to Eight Summers of Experience," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 235-262, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:27:y:2005:i:3:p:235-262
    DOI: 10.1007/s11149-005-6623-6
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11149-005-6623-6
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Herriges, Joseph A, et al, 1993. "The Response of Industrial Customers to Electric Rates Based upon Dynamic Marginal Costs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(3), pages 446-454, August.
    2. Robert H. Patrick & Frank A. Wolak, 2001. "Estimating the Customer-Level Demand for Electricity Under Real-Time Market Prices," NBER Working Papers 8213, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David P. Brown & David E. M. Sappington, 2017. "Optimal policies to promote efficient distributed generation of electricity," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 159-188, October.
    2. Makena Coffman & Paul Bernstein & Sherilyn Wee & Aida Arik, 2016. "Estimating the Opportunity for Load-Shifting in Hawaii: An Analysis of Proposed Residential Time-of-Use Rates," Working Papers 2016-10, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    3. Ahmad Faruqui & Sanem Sergici, 2011. "Dynamic pricing of electricity in the mid-Atlantic region: econometric results from the Baltimore gas and electric company experiment," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 82-109, August.
    4. Zarnikau, J. & Landreth, G. & Hallett, I. & Kumbhakar, S.C., 2007. "Industrial customer response to wholesale prices in the restructured Texas electricity market," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1715-1723.
    5. Allcott, Hunt, 2011. "Rethinking real-time electricity pricing," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 820-842.
    6. Pielow, Amy & Sioshansi, Ramteen & Roberts, Matthew C., 2012. "Modeling short-run electricity demand with long-term growth rates and consumer price elasticity in commercial and industrial sectors," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 533-540.
    7. Woo, C.K. & Sreedharan, P. & Hargreaves, J. & Kahrl, F. & Wang, J. & Horowitz, I., 2014. "A review of electricity product differentiation," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 262-272.
    8. John Curtis, Valeria Di Cosmo, and Paul Deane, 2014. "Climate policy, interconnection and carbon leakage: The effect of unilateral UK policy on electricity and GHG emissions in Ireland," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    9. Kazutoshi Tsuda & Michinori Uwasu & Keishiro Hara & Yukari Fuchigami, 2017. "Approaches to induce behavioral changes with respect to electricity consumption," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 7(1), pages 30-38, March.
    10. repec:aen:journl:ej38-3-brown is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Boom, Anette & Schwenen, Sebastian, 2012. "Real-time Pricing in Power Markets: Who Gains?," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 66062, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    12. James Cochell & Peter Schwarz & Thomas Taylor, 2012. "Using real-time electricity data to estimate response to time-of-use and flat rates: an application to emissions," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 135-158, October.
    13. Woo, C.K. & Li, R. & Shiu, A. & Horowitz, I., 2013. "Residential winter kWh responsiveness under optional time-varying pricing in British Columbia," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 288-297.
    14. Herter, Karen, 2007. "Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 2121-2130, April.
    15. Inha Oh & Yeongjun Yeo & Jeong-Dong Lee, 2015. "Efficiency versus Equality: Comparing Design Options for Indirect Emissions Accounting in the Korean Emissions Trading Scheme," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(11), pages 1-21, November.
    16. David P. Brown & David E. M. Sappington, 2016. "On the optimal design of demand response policies," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 49(3), pages 265-291, June.
    17. Fan, Shu & Hyndman, Rob J., 2011. "The price elasticity of electricity demand in South Australia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3709-3719, June.
    18. Boßmann, Tobias & Eser, Eike Johannes, 2016. "Model-based assessment of demand-response measures—A comprehensive literature review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1637-1656.
    19. Marianna O'Gorman & Frank Jotzo, 2014. "Impact of the Carbon Price on Australia's Electricity Demand, Supply and Emissions," CCEP Working Papers 1411, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    20. Paul L. Joskow, 2012. "Creating a Smarter U.S. Electricity Grid," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(1), pages 29-48, Winter.
    21. Knaut, Andreas & Paulus, Simon, 2016. "When are consumers responding to electricity prices? An hourly pattern of demand elasticity," EWI Working Papers 2016-7, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln (EWI), revised 16 Mar 2017.
    22. Smith, Alexander M. & Brown, Marilyn A., 2015. "Demand response: A carbon-neutral resource?," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 10-22.
    23. Mills, Andrew D. & Wiser, Ryan H., 2015. "Strategies to mitigate declines in the economic value of wind and solar at high penetration in California," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 269-278.
    24. repec:gam:jeners:v:10:y:2017:i:10:p:1537-:d:114079 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Zarnikau, Jay & Hallett, Ian, 2008. "Aggregate industrial energy consumer response to wholesale prices in the restructured Texas electricity market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1798-1808, July.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:27:y:2005:i:3:p:235-262. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.