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“Public goods”: An exercise in calibration

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  • John Hudson
  • Philip Jones

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Abstract

This paper considers a measure of the “publicness” of goods and services implicit in responses that individuals make when asked about public sector spending. At the limit, all consumers consume equal amounts of a public good. Thus any differences between an individual's self-interest preferences and public-interest preferences cannot be based on differential provision, but only on differences in the individual's public- and self-interest utility functions. If we rule out the latter, self-interest and public-interest preferences for a pure public good are identical. Using sample survey data it is possible to calibrate the public good content of different public goods. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • John Hudson & Philip Jones, 2005. "“Public goods”: An exercise in calibration," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 124(3), pages 267-282, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:124:y:2005:i:3:p:267-282
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-005-2048-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Borcherding, Thomas E & Deacon, Robert T, 1972. "The Demand for the Services of Non-Federal Governments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(5), pages 891-901, December.
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    7. Sandler, Todd, 1977. "Impurity of Defense: An Application to the Economics of Alliances," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 443-460.
    8. Green, Francis & Machin, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 1996. "The Employer Size-Wage Effect: Can Dynamic Monopsony Provide an Explanation?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 48(3), pages 433-455, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bogers Marion & Beeres Robert, 2013. "Mission Afghanistan: Who Bears the Heaviest Burden," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 19(1), pages 32-55, April.
    2. Michael Reksulak & William Shughart, 2012. "What should government do? Problems of social cost, externalities and all that," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 152(1), pages 103-114, July.

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