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Demand for Local Public Spending: Evidence from the British Social Attitudes Survey

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  • Preston, Ian
  • Ridge, Michael

Abstract

The British Social Attitudes Survey is a U.K.-wide survey that provides a rich source of information on individuals' attitudes to a variety of topics, including locally provided service. In this paper, the authors seek to model answers to questions on attitudes to local authority spending that invite the expression of a private demand for local public spending. A convincing picture has emerged of locally provided public goods as imperfectly congested public goods, with a price elastic and probably income inelastic demand. The view that central government grants may induce voter confusion over tax prices of public services also finds support. Copyright 1995 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Preston, Ian & Ridge, Michael, 1995. "Demand for Local Public Spending: Evidence from the British Social Attitudes Survey," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(430), pages 644-660, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:105:y:1995:i:430:p:644-60
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    Cited by:

    1. Oliver Schnusenberg & Chung-Ping Loh & Katrin Nihalani, 2013. "The Role of Financial Wellbeing, Sociopolitical Attitude, Self-Interest, and Lifestyle in One’s Attitude Toward Social Health Insurance," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 369-381, August.
    2. Speciale, Biagio, 2012. "Does immigration affect public education expenditures? Quasi-experimental evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(9-10), pages 773-783.
    3. Robert Moffitt, 1999. "Explaining Welfare Reform: Public Choice and the Labor Market," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 6(3), pages 289-315, August.
    4. Cormac O'Dea & Ian Preston, 2012. "The distributional impact of public spending in the UK," IFS Working Papers W12/06, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. Gemmell, Norman & Morrissey, Oliver & Pinar, Abuzer, 2003. "Tax perceptions and the demand for public expenditure: evidence from UK micro-data," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 793-816, November.
    6. John Hudson & Philip Jones, 2005. "“Public goods”: An exercise in calibration," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 124(3), pages 267-282, September.
    7. Hall, John & Preston, Ian, 2000. "Tax price effects on attitudes to hypothecated tax increases," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 417-438, March.
    8. Ashworth, John & Heyndels, Bruno, 1997. "Politicians' preferences on local tax rates: An empirical analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 479-502, September.

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