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Educational Attainment and Timing to First Union Across Three Generations of Mexican Women

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  • Rhiannon Kroeger

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  • Reanne Frank
  • Kammi Schmeer

Abstract

We use data from Wave 3 of the Mexican Family Life Survey (N = 7,276) and discrete-time regression analyses to evaluate changes in the association between educational attainment and timing to first union across three generations of women in Mexico, including a mature cohort (born between 1930 and 1949), a middle cohort (born between 1950 and 1969), and a young cohort (born between 1970 and 1979). Mirroring prior research, we find a curvilinear pattern between educational attainment and timing to first union for women born between 1930 and 1969, such that once we account for the delaying effect of school enrollment, those with the lowest (0–5 years) and highest levels of education (13+ years) are characterized by the earliest transition to a first union. For women born between 1970 and 1979, however, we find that the relationship between educational attainment and timing to first union has changed. In contrast to their peers born in earlier cohorts, highly educated women in Mexico are now postponing first union formation relative to the least educated. We draw on competing theories of educational attainment and timing to first union to help clarify these patterns in the context of Mexico. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Rhiannon Kroeger & Reanne Frank & Kammi Schmeer, 2015. "Educational Attainment and Timing to First Union Across Three Generations of Mexican Women," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 34(3), pages 417-435, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:34:y:2015:i:3:p:417-435
    DOI: 10.1007/s11113-014-9351-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jere R. Behrman & Alejandro Gaviria & Miguel Székely, 2001. "Intergenerational Mobility in Latin America," ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, vol. 0(Fall 2001), pages 1-44, August.
    2. Stephen Gyimah, 2009. "Cohort Differences in Women’s Educational Attainment and the Transition to First Marriage in Ghana," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 28(4), pages 455-471, August.
    3. Marta Domínguez-Folgueras & Teresa Castro-Martín, 2008. "Women’s changing socioeconomic position and union formation in Spain and Portugal," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(41), pages 1513-1550, August.
    4. James Raymo, 2003. "Educational attainment and the transition to first marriage among Japanese women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(1), pages 83-103, February.
    5. Felicia Tian, 2013. "Transition to First Marriage in Reform-Era Urban China: The Persistent Effect of Education in a Period of Rapid Social Change," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(4), pages 529-552, August.
    6. Jere R. Behrman & Alejandro Gaviria & Miguel Székely, 2001. "Intergenerational Mobility in Latin America," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2001), pages 1-44, August.
    7. Dahan, Momi & Gaviria, Alejandro, 2001. "Sibling Correlations and Intergenerational Mobility in Latin America," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(3), pages 537-554, April.
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