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Measurement Error and the Effects of Unions on the Compensating Differentials for Fatal Workplace Risks

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  • Sandy, Robert
  • R. F. Elliot
  • W. S. Siebert
  • X. D. Wei

Abstract

With essentially the same estimation methods and time period but using different UK data sets and risk measures, Sandy and Elliott (1996) found that nonunion male manual workers had a substantially higher fatal risk premium than union workers while Siebert and Wei (1994) found the opposite. This paper attempts to reconcile these conflicting results using the different measures of fatal risk employed in these two studies together on the same data set. The conflicting results are due to several types of measurement error. We find substantial miscoding in the employee-reported industry affiliation as well as larger errors-in-variables bias in the industry-based risk than in the occupation-based risk. Copyright 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Sandy, Robert & R. F. Elliot & W. S. Siebert & X. D. Wei, 2001. "Measurement Error and the Effects of Unions on the Compensating Differentials for Fatal Workplace Risks," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 33-56, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:23:y:2001:i:1:p:33-56
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Grazier, S. & Sloane, P.J., 2008. "Accident risk, gender, family status and occupational choice in the UK," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 938-957, October.
    2. Anna Alberini, 2017. "Measuring the economic value of the effects of chemicals on ecological systems and human health," OECD Environment Working Papers 116, OECD Publishing.
    3. Beat Hintermann & Anna Alberini & Anil Markandya, 2010. "Estimating the value of safety with labour market data: are the results trustworthy?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(9), pages 1085-1100.
    4. Viscusi, W Kip & Aldy, Joseph E, 2003. "The Value of a Statistical Life: A Critical Review of Market Estimates throughout the World," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 5-76, August.
    5. Dionne, Georges & Lebeau, Martin, 2010. "Le calcul de la valeur statistique d’une vie humaine," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 86(4), pages 487-530, décembre.
    6. Bellavance, Franois & Dionne, Georges & Lebeau, Martin, 2009. "The value of a statistical life: A meta-analysis with a mixed effects regression model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 444-464, March.
    7. Benkhalifa, Abdelaziz, 2014. "Rôle du syndicat dans la détermination de la valeur de la vie statistique en Tunisie
      [Trade union role in determining the value of a statistical life in Tunisia]
      ," MPRA Paper 63736, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Matthew Cole & Robert Elliott & Joanne Lindley, 2009. "Dirty money: Is there a wage premium for working in a pollution intensive industry?," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 161-180, October.
    9. Abdelaziz Benkhalifa & Paul Lanoie & Mohamed Ayadi, 2013. "Estimated hedonic wage function and value of life in an African country," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(4), pages 3023-3031.
    10. Xiangdong Wei, 2007. "Wage compensation for job-related illness: Evidence from a matched employer and employee survey in the UK," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 85-98, February.

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