IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jrefec/v30y2005i3p297-315.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

REIT Stock Splits and Market Efficiency

Author

Listed:
  • William Hardin

    ()

  • Kartono Liano

    ()

  • Gow-Cheng Huang

    ()

Abstract

An analysis of real estate investment trust (REIT) stock splits is presented. Evaluation of the initial reaction to split REITs supports efficient market pricing where REITs generate statistically significant positive announcement date returns, no statistically significant record date returns, and muted ex-date returns. In the long-term, split REITs do not consistently out perform benchmark portfolios over one-year, two-year, and three-year periods. REITs split subsequent to a substantial run up in stock price and to improve the position of their post split stock price relative to the stock price of the typical REIT. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • William Hardin & Kartono Liano & Gow-Cheng Huang, 2005. "REIT Stock Splits and Market Efficiency," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 297-315, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrefec:v:30:y:2005:i:3:p:297-315
    DOI: 10.1007/s11146-005-6409-8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11146-005-6409-8
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mitchell, Mark L & Stafford, Erik, 2000. "Managerial Decisions and Long-Term Stock Price Performance," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73(3), pages 287-329, July.
    2. Fama, Eugene F & French, Kenneth R, 1992. " The Cross-Section of Expected Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 427-465, June.
    3. Michael Bradley & Dennis R. Capozza & Paul J. Seguin, 1998. "Dividend Policy and Cash-Flow Uncertainty," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 26(4), pages 555-580.
    4. Desai, Hemang & Jain, Prem C, 1997. "Long-Run Common Stock Returns following Stock Splits and Reverse Splits," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70(3), pages 409-433, July.
    5. Dennis R. Capozza & Paul J. Seguin, 2003. "Inside Ownership, Risk Sharing and Tobin's q-Ratios: Evidence from REITs," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 31(3), pages 367-404, September.
    6. Edward F. Nelling & James M. Mahoney & Terry L. Hildebrand & Michael A. Goldstein, 1995. "Real Estate Investment Trusts, Small Stocks and Bid-ask Spreads," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 23(1), pages 45-63.
    7. So, Raymond W & Tse, Yiuman, 2000. "Rationality of Stock Splits: The Target-Price Habit Hypothesis," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 67-84, January.
    8. Fama, Eugene F, et al, 1969. "The Adjustment of Stock Prices to New Information," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 10(1), pages 1-21, February.
    9. Grinblatt, Mark S. & Masulis, Ronald W. & Titman, Sheridan, 1984. "The valuation effects of stock splits and stock dividends," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 461-490, December.
    10. Barber, Brad M. & Lyon, John D., 1997. "Detecting long-run abnormal stock returns: The empirical power and specification of test statistics," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 341-372, March.
    11. Fama, Eugene F. & French, Kenneth R., 1993. "Common risk factors in the returns on stocks and bonds," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 3-56, February.
    12. Ko Wang & John Erickson & George W. Gau, 1993. "Dividend Policies and Dividend Announcement Effects for Real Estate Investment Trusts," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 21(2), pages 185-201.
    13. Michael T. Maloney & J. Harold Mulherin, 1992. "The Effects of Splitting on the Ex: A Microstructure Reconciliation," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 21(4), Winter.
    14. Lamoureux, Christopher G & Poon, Percy, 1987. " The Market Reaction to Stock Splits," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(5), pages 1347-1370, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin Blau & Matthew Hill & Hao Wang, 2011. "REIT Short Sales and Return Predictability," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 42(4), pages 481-503, May.
    2. James Doran & David Peterson & S. Price, 2012. "Earnings Conference Call Content and Stock Price: The Case of REITs," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 402-434, August.
    3. S. McKay Price & Michael J. Seiler & Jiancheng Shen, 2017. "Do Investors Infer Vocal Cues from CEOs During Quarterly REIT Conference Calls?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 54(4), pages 515-557, May.
    4. James C. Brau & Andrew Holmes, 2006. "Why Do REITs Repurchase Stock? Extricating the Effect of Managerial Signaling in Open Market Share Repurchase Announcements," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 28(1), pages 1-24.
    5. Qiang Li & Hua Sun & Seow Ong, 2006. "REIT Splits and Dividend Changes: Tests of Signaling and Information Substitutability," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 127-150, September.
    6. Crystal Lin & Hamid Rahman & Kenneth Yung, 2009. "Investor Sentiment and REIT Returns," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 450-471, November.
    7. Erik Devos & Andrew Spieler & Desmond Tsang, 2014. "Elective Stock Dividends and REITs: Evidence from the Financial Crisis," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(1), pages 33-70, March.
    8. Zhilan Feng & Chinmoy Ghosh & C. Sirmans, 2007. "Director Compensation and CEO Bargaining Power in REITs," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 225-251, October.
    9. Gow-Cheng Huang & Kartono Liano & Ming-Shiun Pan, 2011. "REIT Stock Splits and Liquidity Changes," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 527-547, November.
    10. SeungHan Ro & Paul Gallimore, 2014. "Real Estate Mutual Funds: Herding, Momentum Trading and Performance," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(1), pages 190-222, March.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jrefec:v:30:y:2005:i:3:p:297-315. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.