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Information and Export Performance


  • Alessandro Nicita


  • Marcelo Olarreaga



Exporters’ performance in a given market may affect their exports to the rest of the world. Importers base their future transaction decisions upon the information revealed by exporter’s performance in other countries. This paper estimates significant effects from these information spillovers on the export patterns of fourteen developing countries, and somewhat smaller effects for a sample of exporters from six developed countries. On the other hand, it is in developed countries’ markets that the largest information spillovers are generated. Indeed, increases in market share in the United States allows for significant increases in exports to the rest-of-the world associated with information spillovers. But developing country markets could also generate important amounts of information for regional exporters. Hong Kong is the top market in terms of generating information for other East Asian exporters, and the Argentinean and Chilean markets play an important role for exporters from other Latin American countries. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandro Nicita & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2007. "Information and Export Performance," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 95-111, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jincot:v:7:y:2007:i:2:p:95-111 DOI: 10.1007/s10842-007-0008-8

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
    2. Feenstra Robert C & Hanson Gordon H. & Lin Songhua, 2004. "The Value of Information in International Trade: Gains to Outsourcing through Hong Kong," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-37, August.
    3. Feenstra, Robert C, 2002. "Border Effects and the Gravity Equation: Consistent Methods for Estimation," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(5), pages 491-506, December.
    4. Philippe Martin & Thierry Mayer & Mathias Thoenig, 2008. "Make Trade Not War?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(3), pages 865-900.
    5. Portes, Richard & Rey, Helene & Oh, Yonghyup, 2001. "Information and capital flows: The determinants of transactions in financial assets," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 783-796, May.
    6. McLaren, John, 1999. "Supplier relations and the market context: A theory of handshakes," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 121-138, June.
    7. Keith Head & John Ries, 1998. "Immigration and Trade Creation: Econometric Evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 47-62, February.
    8. Rauch, James E., 1999. "Networks versus markets in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 7-35, June.
    9. Veall, Michael R & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1996. " Pseudo-R-[superscript 2] Measures for Some Common Limited Dependent Variable Models," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(3), pages 241-259, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Nicita & Bolormaa Tumurchudur-Klok, 2011. "New And Traditional Trade Flows And The Economic Crisis," UNCTAD Blue Series Papers 49, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    2. repec:eee:touman:v:32:y:2011:i:4:p:750-758 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. E. Marrocu & R. Paci, 2009. "They arrive with new information. Tourism flows and production efficiency in the European regions," Working Paper CRENoS 200910, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    4. Li, Hengyun & Chen, Jason Li & Li, Gang & Goh, Carey, 2016. "Tourism and regional income inequality: Evidence from China," Annals of Tourism Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 81-99.

    More about this item


    export; information spillovers; developing countries; F10; F13; F14;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade


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