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Measuring network effects on trade: Are Japanese affiliates distinctive?


  • Greaney, Theresa M.


This paper examines network effects on trade by comparing the trade patterns of foreign affiliates in the United States with the trade patterns of U.S.-owned firms. The evidence strongly supports the following hypotheses: 1) foreign affiliates behave differently from U.S. firms in their trade patterns; 2) in particular, foreign affiliates display strong home biases in their trade patterns; and 3) among the foreign affiliates, Japanese affiliates demonstrate by far the strongest home bias in their trade patterns. Controlling for income and distance effects, foreign affiliates from Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Switzerland traded on average 17 times more with their respective home countries and those from the United Kingdom traded 30 times more with the United Kingdom, while Japanese affiliates traded a whopping 130 times more with Japan.
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Suggested Citation

  • Greaney, Theresa M., 2005. "Measuring network effects on trade: Are Japanese affiliates distinctive?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 194-214, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jjieco:v:19:y:2005:i:2:p:194-214

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Greaney, Theresa M., 2003. "Reverse importing and asymmetric trade and FDI: a networks explanation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 453-465, December.
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    10. Greif, Avner, 1993. "Contract Enforceability and Economic Institutions in Early Trade: the Maghribi Traders' Coalition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 525-548, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shuhei Nishitateno, 2015. "Network Effects on Trade in Intermediate Goods: Evidence from the Automobile Industry," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 66(3), pages 354-370, September.
    2. Kyoji Fukao & Toshihiro Okubo, 2004. "Why Has the Border Effect in the Japanese Market Declined?: The Role of Business Networks in East Asia," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d03-24, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Belderbos, René & Wakasugi, Ryuhei & Zou, Jianglei, 2012. "Business groups, foreign direct investment, and capital goods trade: The import behavior of Japanese affiliates," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 187-200.
    4. Jörn Kleinert & Farid Toubal, 2013. "Production versus distribution-oriented FDI," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(3), pages 423-442, September.
    5. Greaney, Theresa M., 2009. "Measuring network effects on trade: A reexamination," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 219-225, August.
    6. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Cletus C. Coughlin & Howard J. Wall, 2008. "Ethnic Networks and US Exports," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 199-213, February.
    7. Christopher R. Parsons & L. Alan Winters, 2014. "International migration, trade and aid: a survey," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 4, pages 65-112 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Fukao, Kyoji & Okubo, Toshihiro, 2011. "Why Has the Border Effect in the Japanese Machinery Sectors Declined?: The Role of Business Networks in East Asian Machinery Trade," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 26, pages 651-671.
    9. Shuhei Nishitateno, 2012. "Global Production Sharing in the Japanese Automobile Industry: A Comparative Analysis," Departmental Working Papers 2012-02, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    10. Lee, Jaehwa, 2012. "Network effects on international trade," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(2), pages 199-201.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business


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