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Financial Literacy: Building Economic Empowerment with Survivors of Violence

Author

Listed:
  • Judy Postmus

    ()

  • Sara-Beth Plummer

    ()

  • Sarah McMahon

    ()

  • Karen Zurlo

    ()

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to outline key constructs including financial literacy, economic self-efficacy, economic self-sufficiency, and economic empowerment, and then present findings from an exploratory study that sought to understand the relationship among these variables in a sample of abused women. The results revealed positive and significant relationships between financial literacy with economic empowerment, economic self-efficacy and economic-self sufficiency. Results also indicated that financial literacy, race, and economic self-sufficiency were significant predictors of economic empowerment. By focusing this research on abused women, it is our intention to raise awareness about the importance of financial literacy curricula with advocates, policy-makers and researchers, so more focus can be given to economically empowering IPV survivors. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Judy Postmus & Sara-Beth Plummer & Sarah McMahon & Karen Zurlo, 2013. "Financial Literacy: Building Economic Empowerment with Survivors of Violence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 275-284, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:34:y:2013:i:3:p:275-284
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-012-9330-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Clinton Gudmunson & Sharon Danes, 2011. "Family Financial Socialization: Theory and Critical Review," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 644-667, December.
    2. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2006.095521_7 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Lucie Schmidt & Purvi Sevak, 2006. "Gender, Marriage, And Asset Accumulation In The United States," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1-2), pages 139-166.
    4. Ebonya Washington, 2006. "The Impact of Banking and Fringe Banking Regulation on the Number of Unbanked Americans," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(1).
    5. Marianne A. Hilgert & Jeanne M. Hogarth & Sondra G. Beverly, 2003. "Household financial management: the connection between knowledge and behavior," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Jul, pages 309-322.
    6. Sandra F. Braunstein & Carolyn Welch, 2002. "Financial literacy: an overview of practice, research, and policy," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Nov, pages 445-457.
    7. David Schramm & V. William Harris, 2011. "Marital Quality and Income: An Examination of the Influence of Government Assistance," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 437-448, September.
    8. Michael Gutter & Zeynep Copur, 2011. "Financial Behaviors and Financial Well-Being of College Students: Evidence from a National Survey," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 699-714, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Hetling & Judy L. Postmus & Cecilia Kaltz, 2016. "A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Financial Literacy Curriculum for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 672-685, December.
    2. E. Pastrapa & C. Apostolopoulos, 2015. "Estimating Determinants of Borrowing: Evidence from Greece," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 210-223, June.

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