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The Impact of Banking and Fringe Banking Regulation on the Number of Unbanked Americans

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  • Ebonya Washington

Abstract

Thirty-five to 45 percent of low-income American households do not possess a bank account. This statistic coupled with claims of price gouging by check cashers has prompted government intervention. I find that state legislation requiring banks to offer low-cost accounts slightly decreases the number of low-income minority unbanked households, but only with a substantial lag. Caps on check-cashing fees also lead to a small, but more immediate, reduction in the number of unbanked among this population. Because price caps may lead to a reduction in supply, welfare effects are indeterminate.

Suggested Citation

  • Ebonya Washington, 2006. "The Impact of Banking and Fringe Banking Regulation on the Number of Unbanked Americans," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:41:y:2006:i:1:p106-137
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    Cited by:

    1. Felipe Kast & Dina Pomeranz, 2013. "Saving More to Borrow Less: Experimental Evidence from Access to Formal Savings Accounts in Chile," Harvard Business School Working Papers 14-001, Harvard Business School, revised Jun 2014.
    2. Smriti Rao & Hazel Malapit, 2015. "Gender, Household Structure and Financial Participation in the United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 606-620, December.
    3. Katie Fitzpatrick, 2015. "Does “Banking the Unbanked” Help Families to Save? Evidence from the United Kingdom," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 223-249, March.
    4. Miguel Ampudia & Michael Ehrmann, 2016. "Financial Inclusion—What’s it Worth?," Staff Working Papers 16-30, Bank of Canada.
    5. Kristin Turney & Daniel Schneider, 2016. "Incarceration and Household Asset Ownership," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(6), pages 2075-2103, December.
    6. repec:bla:jconsa:v:51:y:2017:i:3:p:631-658 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Judy Postmus & Sara-Beth Plummer & Sarah McMahon & Karen Zurlo, 2013. "Financial Literacy: Building Economic Empowerment with Survivors of Violence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 275-284, September.
    8. Giorgia Barboni & Alessandra Cassar & Timothee Demont, 2017. "Financial exclusion in developed countries: a field experiment among migrants and low-income people in Italy," Journal of Behavioral Economics for Policy, Society for the Advancement of Behavioral Economics (SABE), vol. 1(2), pages 39-49, September.

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