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A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Financial Literacy Curriculum for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

Listed author(s):
  • Andrea Hetling

    ()

    (Rutgers University)

  • Judy L. Postmus

    (Rutgers University)

  • Cecilia Kaltz

    (Rutgers University)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract Financial literacy programs are quickly gaining in popularity around the globe. A relatively new target group is survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV), an economically vulnerable group for whom resource acquisition is related to personal safety and well-being. This study is a randomized controlled trial of a financial literacy curriculum designed for and delivered to a sample of 300 IPV survivors from 14 agencies in seven US states and Puerto Rico. Findings, based on difference-in-difference analyses and OLS regression models, indicate a strong effect of the curriculum on self-reported financial knowledge and behaviors and support the expansion of similar programs for survivors.

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    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10834-015-9479-7
    File Function: Abstract
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Family and Economic Issues.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2016)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 672-685

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:37:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s10834-015-9479-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-015-9479-7
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/journal/10834/PS2

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