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Fair Trade: Dynamic and Dilemmas of a Market Oriented Global Social Movement

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  • John Wilkinson

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Abstract

Fair Trade is analysed as a new economic social movement to the extent that it is based on new forms of collective action and directs its demands primarily to the market rather than to the State. In addition, it is intrinsically a global movement harnessing development goals to new market relations. It differs, however, from similar movements (organics, animal welfare) to the extent that it focuses primarily on traditional issues of redistributive justice rather than a new generation of rights and duties. Fair Trade is understood as having three components: (i) the organization of alternative trading networks; (ii) the marketing of Fair Trade labelled products through licensed conventional traders and retailers; and (iii) the campaign-based promotion of Fair Trade to change both purchasing practices and the rules of conventional trade. As a market oriented movement, Fair Trade relies crucially on the emergence of a new politicization of consumer activity comprising not only “consumer-activists” but also the State as consumer and a new layer of political consumers sensitive to issues of social justice in their daily purchasing practices. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Suggested Citation

  • John Wilkinson, 2007. "Fair Trade: Dynamic and Dilemmas of a Market Oriented Global Social Movement," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 219-239, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jcopol:v:30:y:2007:i:3:p:219-239
    DOI: 10.1007/s10603-007-9036-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Redfern, Andy. & Snedker, Paul., 2002. "Creating market opportunities for small enterprises : experiences of the fair trade movement," ILO Working Papers 993570693402676, International Labour Organization.
    2. Sally Smith & Stephanie Barrientos, 2005. "Fair trade and ethical trade: are there moves towards convergence?," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(3), pages 190-198.
    3. repec:ilo:ilowps:357069 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. John Cranfield & Spencer Henson & James Northey & Oliver Masakure, 2010. "An assessment of consumer preference for fair trade coffee in Toronto and Vancouver," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(2), pages 307-325.
    2. Iain Davies, 2009. "Alliances and Networks: Creating Success in the UK Fair Trade Market," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 86(1), pages 109-126, April.
    3. Khumon Prapanpong, 2012. "Microtrade and the Fair Trade Movement," The Law and Development Review, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 50-79, May.
    4. A. Leeuw & Pierre Valois & Alexandre Morin & Peter Schmidt, 2014. "Gender Differences in Psychosocial Determinants of University Students’ Intentions to Buy Fair Trade Products," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 485-505, December.
    5. Eeva L. Laine & Matias Laine, 2009. "Finnish World Shops at a crossroads in the commercialized fair trade market," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 274-283.
    6. Carsten Gandenberger & Heiko Garrelts & Diana Wehlau, 2011. "Assessing the Effects of Certification Networks on Sustainable Production and Consumption: The Cases of FLO and FSC," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 107-126, March.
    7. Schollenberg, Linda, 2011. "So how much do you pay for ethical consumption? Estimating the hedonic price for Fair Trade coffee in Sweden," HUI Working Papers 31, HUI Research.
    8. Viorel Mionel & Oana Mionel & Alexandra Moraru, 2014. "The Relation between Fair Trade and Supermarkets: Spatial Implications for the Global Economy," Knowledge Horizons - Economics, Faculty of Finance, Banking and Accountancy Bucharest,"Dimitrie Cantemir" Christian University Bucharest, vol. 6(2), pages 109-113, June.
    9. Benjamin Huybrechts, 2010. "Fair Trade Organizations in Belgium: Unity in Diversity?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 92(2), pages 217-240, April.
    10. Sandra Moog & André Spicer & Steffen Böhm, 2015. "The Politics of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives: The Crisis of the Forest Stewardship Council," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 128(3), pages 469-493, May.
    11. Stefan Hoffmann & Katharina Hutter, 2012. "Carrotmob as a New Form of Ethical Consumption. The Nature of the Concept and Avenues for Future Research," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 215-236, June.
    12. Lance Bennett, 2012. "Grounding the European Public Sphere - Looking Beyond the Mass Media to Digitally Mediated Issue Publics," KFG Working Papers p0043, Free University Berlin.
    13. Curtis Child, 2015. "Mainstreaming and its Discontents: Fair Trade, Socially Responsible Investing, and Industry Trajectories," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 130(3), pages 601-618, September.
    14. Iain Davies & Bob Doherty & Simon Knox, 2010. "The Rise and Stall of a Fair Trade Pioneer: The Cafédirect Story," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 92(1), pages 127-147, March.
    15. Wilkinson, John, 2010. "Economic and agrofood studies in brazil: Combining social networks, convention and social movement approaches," economic sociology_the european electronic newsletter, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, vol. 11(2), pages 3-9.
    16. Eleanor Fisher, 2009. "Introduction: The policy trajectory of fair trade," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(7), pages 985-1003.
    17. Steve Suranovic, 2015. "The Meaning of Fair Trade," Working Papers 2015-2, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    18. Rommel Salvador & Altaf Merchant & Elizabeth Alexander, 2014. "Faith and Fair Trade: The Moderating Role of Contextual Religious Salience," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 121(3), pages 353-371, May.
    19. Jess Bonnan-White & Andrea Hightower & Ameena Issa, 2013. "Of couscous and occupation: a case study of women’s motivations to join and participate in Palestinian fair trade cooperatives," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 30(3), pages 337-350, September.

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