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Social Exclusion and Transgenic Technology: The Case of Brazilian Agriculture

Author

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  • Jeremy Hall

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  • Stelvia Matos

    ()

  • Cooper Langford

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Jeremy Hall & Stelvia Matos & Cooper Langford, 2008. "Social Exclusion and Transgenic Technology: The Case of Brazilian Agriculture," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 77(1), pages 45-63, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:77:y:2008:i:1:p:45-63 DOI: 10.1007/s10551-006-9293-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Herbert A. Simon, 1996. "The Sciences of the Artificial, 3rd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262691914, January.
    2. Erik Millstone & Patrick Zwanenberg, 2003. "Food and Agricultural Biotechnology Policy: How Much Autonomy Can Developing Countries Exercise?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 21(5-6), pages 655-667, December.
    3. Ted London & Stuart L Hart, 2004. "Reinventing strategies for emerging markets: beyond the transnational model," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 35(5), pages 350-370, September.
    4. Hobday, Mike, 1995. "East Asian latecomer firms: Learning the technology of electronics," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(7), pages 1171-1193, July.
    5. Phillips, Robert & Freeman, R. Edward & Wicks, Andrew C., 2003. "What Stakeholder Theory is Not," Business Ethics Quarterly, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(04), pages 479-502, October.
    6. Giovanni Dosi & Christopher Freeman & Richard Nelson & Gerarld Silverberg & Luc Soete (ed.), 1988. "Technical Change and Economic Theory," LEM Book Series, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy, number dosietal-1988, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gauder, Martin & Graeff-Hönninger, S. & Claupein, W., 2011. "The impact of a growing bioethanol industry on food production in Brazil," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 672-679.
    2. Klara Fischer & Elisabeth Ekener-Petersen & Lotta Rydhmer & Karin Edvardsson Björnberg, 2015. "Social Impacts of GM Crops in Agriculture: A Systematic Literature Review," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(7), pages 1-23, July.
    3. Elisa Giuliani & Chiara Macchi, 2013. "Multinational Corporations’ Economic And Human Rights Impacts On Developing Countries: A Review And Research Agenda," Discussion Papers 2013/158, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    4. Hall, Jeremy K. & Daneke, Gregory A. & Lenox, Michael J., 2010. "Sustainable development and entrepreneurship: Past contributions and future directions," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 439-448, September.

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