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Effects of macroeconomic fluctuations on mental health and psychotropic medicine consumption

Author

Listed:
  • Mario Martínez-Jiménez

    (Division of Health Research, Faculty of Health & Medicine, Lancaster University)

  • Judit Vall Castelló

    (University of Barcelona & IEB
    CRES-UPF)

Abstract

Our aim in this paper is to understand the impact of macroeconomic fluctuations on mental health and psychotropic medicine consumption. In order to do that we exploit differences in the fluctuations of business cycle conditions across regional units in Catalonia. Our findings suggest that, in general, economic fluctuations at the local level had no significant effect on the consumption of psychotropic medicines. However, we show that a deterioration in local labour market conditions is associated with a reduction in the consumption of anxiolytics medicines. We also report an increase in the consumption of anxiolytics in regions with a softer deterioration in the economic situation. Although we report mild improvements in both mental and physical health for some sub-groups of the population, we also find significant reductions on the probability of sleeping 6 h or more. Thus, these elements point towards potential negative effects of local labour market conditions on health in the medium/long term.

Suggested Citation

  • Mario Martínez-Jiménez & Judit Vall Castelló, 2020. "Effects of macroeconomic fluctuations on mental health and psychotropic medicine consumption," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 277-297, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:20:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1007_s10754-020-09281-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s10754-020-09281-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 7th September 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-09-07 11:00:07

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Psychotropic consumption; Business cycle fluctuations; Mental and physical health;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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