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Reproducible research in computational economics: guidelines, integrated approaches, and open source software

  • Giovanni Baiocchi

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    Traditionally, computer and software applications have been used by economists to off-load otherwise complex or tedious tasks onto technology, freeing up time and intellect to address other, intellectually more rewarding, aspects of research. On the negative side, this increasing dependence on computers has resulted in research that has become increasingly difficult to replicate. In this paper, we propose some basic standards to improve the production and reporting of computational results in economics for the purpose of accuracy and reproducibility. In particular, we make recommendations on four aspects of the process: computational practice, published reporting, supporting documentation, and visualization. Also, we reflect on current developments in the practice of computing and visualization, such as integrated dynamic electronic documents, distributed computing systems, open source software, and their potential usefulness in making computational and empirical research in economics more easily reproducible. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10614-007-9084-4
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    Article provided by Society for Computational Economics in its journal Computational Economics.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 1 (August)
    Pages: 19-40

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:compec:v:30:y:2007:i:1:p:19-40
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