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Design and Value: Spatial Form and the Economic Failure of a Mall

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Abstract

Real estate analysts have not had the tools to identify the functional problems of real estate because they have not focused on configuration. Space syntax is a way to represent, describe and evaluate spatial configurations or patterns created through building and urban design. Space syntax was used to systematically describe the configuration of a failed luxury shopping mall. Shape recognition techniques transform the plan into a mathematical network that can be analyzed. Network node parameters can be related to more traditional measures like occupancy and revenues by location. Thus revealed, the underlying spatial structure of the failed mall is compared to that of a similar but successful mall and its functional deficiencies identified.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Gordon Brown, 1999. "Design and Value: Spatial Form and the Economic Failure of a Mall," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 17(2), pages 189-226.
  • Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:17:n:2:1999:p:189-226
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carlo Bagnoli & Halbert C. Smith, 1998. "The Theory of Fuzzy Logic and its Application to Real Estate Valuation," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 16(2), pages 169-200.
    2. Kerry D. Vandell & Jonathan S. Lane, 1989. "The Economics of Architecture and Urban Design: Some Preliminary Findings," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 17(2), pages 235-260.
    3. Mark J. Eppli & James D. Shilling, 1996. "How Critical Is a Good Location to a Regional Shopping Center?," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 12(3), pages 459-468.
    4. Mark J. Eppli & James D. Shilling, 1996. "How Critical is a Good Location to a Regional Shopping Center?," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 96-03, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francois Des Rosiers & Marius Theriault & Laurent Menetrier, 2005. "Spatial Versus Non-Spatial Determinants of Shopping Center Rents: Modeling Location and Neighborhood-Related Factors," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 27(3), pages 293-320.
    2. Tony ShunTe Yuo & Yu-Cheng Lin & Jou-Hsuan Wu & Kuan-Yu Huang, 2013. "Shopping Centre Spatial Complexity, Management Efficiency and Tenant Mix Variety," ERES eres2013_46, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    3. Rickard Enström & Olof Netzell, 2008. "Can Space Syntax Help Us in Understanding the Intraurban Office Rent Pattern? Accessibility and Rents in Downtown Stockholm," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 289-305, April.
    4. Francois Des Rosiers & Marius Theriault & Catherine Lavoie, 2009. "Retail Concentration and Shopping Center Rents - A Comparison of Two Cities," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 31(2), pages 165-208.
    5. Michael R. Doyle & Philippe Thalmann & Aurèle Parriaux, 2016. "Underground Potential for Urban Sustainability: Mapping Resources and Their Interactions with the Deep City Method," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(9), pages 1-17, August.
    6. repec:eee:joreco:v:18:y:2011:i:1:p:110-118 is not listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services

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