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Remittances and Conflict: Some Conceptual Considerations

  • Lindley Anna

    ()

    (Department of Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London,WC1H 0XG, Great Britain)

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    The relationship between migration and development processes in migrants’ countries of origin has been subject to extensive scrutiny in the last decade by researchers and policy-makers. Migrants’ remittances have been fore-grounded as a key aspect in this relationship and have increasingly been seen as a potential source of ‘development capital’. Yet the fact that migration and remitting are often entangled in processes of violent conflict and political upheaval is often overlooked. This paper uses the Somali case to raise a set of conceptual issues regarding the dynamics and impact of remittances in conflict-affected settings. The implications of the violent causation of migration, the on-going conditions in the country of origin, and the post-migration situation of refugees are advanced as key ways in which remittance dynamics in conflict situations may differ from those in more peaceful settings.

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    File URL: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jbnst.2009.229.issue-6/jbnst-2009-0607/jbnst-2009-0607.xml?format=INT
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    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik).

    Volume (Year): 229 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 6 (December)
    Pages: 774-786

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    Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:229:y:2009:i:6:p:774-786
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    1. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
    2. Poirine, Bernard, 1997. "A theory of remittances as an implicit family loan arrangement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 589-611, January.
    3. Paul Collier & Anke Hoeffler, 2004. "Greed and grievance in civil war," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(4), pages 563-595, October.
    4. Paul Collier & Anke Hoeffler & Måns Söderbom, 2006. "Post-conflict risks," CSAE Working Paper Series 2006-12, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    5. Paul Collier & V. L. Elliott & Håvard Hegre & Anke Hoeffler & Marta Reynal-Querol & Nicholas Sambanis, 2003. "Breaking the Conflict Trap : Civil War and Development Policy," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13938, August.
    6. Stark, Oded & Bloom, David E, 1985. "The New Economics of Labor Migration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 173-78, May.
    7. Lucas, Robert E B & Stark, Oded, 1985. "Motivations to Remit: Evidence from Botswana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(5), pages 901-18, October.
    8. Flore Gubert, 2002. "Do Migrants Insure Those who Stay Behind? Evidence from the Kayes Area (Western Mali)," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 267-287.
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