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Structure or agency? Explaining Armenia’s foreign policy evolution

Author

Listed:
  • John H.S. ABERG

    () (Malmö University, Sweden)

  • Aram TERZYAN

    () (Malmö University, Sweden)

Abstract

The article scrutinizes Armenia’s foreign policy trajectory since its independence. It applies a model of foreign policy analysis that takes into account structural, dispositional, and intentional dimensions and outlines a more dynamic structure-agency interplay. By contrast to reductionist system-level explanations, the argument is that individual-level factors such as the perceptions and beliefs of Armenia’s presidents are central to understanding why Armenia embarked on a foreign policy path where it became economically and militarily absorbed by Russia. The case study of Armenia’s foreign policy serves as a plausibility probe that illustrates the relevance of individual-level factors in foreign policy decision making. The article thus offers insights into the foreign policy of a small state.

Suggested Citation

  • John H.S. ABERG & Aram TERZYAN, 2018. "Structure or agency? Explaining Armenia’s foreign policy evolution," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 9, pages 151-172, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:jes:journl:y:2018:v:9:p:151-172
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    File URL: http://ejes.uaic.ro/articles/EJES2018_0901_ABE.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aram TERZYAN, 2017. "The EU vs. Russia in the foreign policy discourse of Armenia: the fragility of normative power or the power of Russian coercion?," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 8, pages 185-203, December.
    2. Elman, Miriam Fendius, 1995. "The Foreign Policies of Small States: Challenging Neorealism in Its Own Backyard," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 171-217, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Aram TERZYAN, 2019. "The Aftermath of the "Velvet Revolution": Armenia Between Domestic Change and Foreign Policy Continuity," Eastern European Journal for Regional Studies (EEJRS), Center for Studies in European Integration (CSEI), Academy of Economic Studies of Moldova (ASEM), vol. 5(2), pages 24-43, December.
    2. Aram TERZYAN, 2020. "Structure - Agency Problem in Foreign Policy Analysis of Post-Soviet States: The Cases of Armenia and Ukraine," Eastern European Journal for Regional Studies (EEJRS), Center for Studies in European Integration (CSEI), Academy of Economic Studies of Moldova (ASEM), vol. 6(1), pages 44-68, June.
    3. Aram TERZYAN, 2019. "Russian policy, Russian Armenians and Armenia: ethnic minority or political leverage?," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 11(2), pages 124-142, July.

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