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Russian policy, Russian Armenians and Armenia: ethnic minority or political leverage?

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  • Aram TERZYAN

    (PhD, is a visiting senior lecturer at UNESCO Chair of Human Rights, Democracy and European Studies of Brusov State University of Languages and Social Sciences and research fellow at Eurasian Research and Analysis Institute, USA)

Abstract

The 2018 “Velvet revolution” in Armenia has raised numerous questions regarding its possible implications for Armenian-Russian relations. Given that there was a tendency for revolutions in post- Soviet countries to significantly influence their relations with Russia, it would be easy to jump to farreaching conclusions about Armenia’s possible foreign policy changes. This paper explores the potential of the diasporic influence of the Armenian community in Russia over Armenian-Russian relations in the light of the Russian policy towards further consolidating its control over post-Velvet Revolution Armenia. The study is based on qualitative research methods elaborating an in-depth case analysis through process tracing. It posits that Armenia remains highly susceptible to the diasporic influence, emanating particularly from the Armenian community in Russia, that, along with other political and economic constraints, determines Armenia’s unwavering allegiance to Russia. In doing so, the paper aims to enquire into the potential for the Armenian Diaspora to influence homeland’s foreign policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Aram TERZYAN, 2019. "Russian policy, Russian Armenians and Armenia: ethnic minority or political leverage?," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 11(2), pages 124-142, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:jes:wpaper:y:2019:v:11:i:2:p:124-142
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aram TERZYAN, 2016. "The evolution of the European Union’s conception in the foreign policy discourse of Armenia: implications for U-turn and the path beyond the Association Agreement," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 7, pages 165-184, December.
    2. Aram TERZYAN, 2017. "The EU vs. Russia in the foreign policy discourse of Armenia: the fragility of normative power or the power of Russian coercion?," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 8, pages 185-203, December.
    3. Shain, Yossi & Barth, Aharon, 2003. "Diasporas and International Relations Theory," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(3), pages 449-479, July.
    4. John H.S. ABERG & Aram TERZYAN, 2018. "Structure or agency? Explaining Armenia’s foreign policy evolution," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 9, pages 151-172, June.
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    1. Aram TERZYAN, 2020. "Change or continuity? Exploring post-revolution state - building in Ukraine and Armenia," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 12(1), pages 20-41, May.

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