IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/jed/journl/v31y2006i2p73-90.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Agricultural Development, State Effectiveness And Long-Run Economic Development

Author

Listed:
  • Sharmistha Self

    (Department of Economics, Missouri State University)

  • Richard Grabowski

    () (Department of Economics, Southern Illinois University)

Abstract

This paper begins with the presumption that rapid economic development requires an effective state. An effective state is able to act independently of powerful interest groups with the aim of allocating resources so as to maximize long-term economic growth. It will be argued that such states are more likely to arise in situations within which the state must earn its income. That is, it must construct an institutional apparatus to extract the revenue that it needs and it is dependent upon the bulk of its agricultural producers to produce this revenue. The higher agricultural productivity within a region, the more dependent the state will be on revenues from the bulk of its agricultural producers. This dependency will lead, through a dialectical process, to a state whose activities will be constrained, a state which will be able to effectively commit itself to long-run development. This proposition is tested using time series/cross-sectional data for a sample of diverse countries from the 1960¡¯s through 1990¡¯s.

Suggested Citation

  • Sharmistha Self & Richard Grabowski, 2006. "Agricultural Development, State Effectiveness And Long-Run Economic Development," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 31(2), pages 73-90, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:jed:journl:v:31:y:2006:i:2:p:73-90
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.jed.or.kr/full-text/31-2/4.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bockstette, Valerie & Chanda, Areendam & Putterman, Louis, 2002. "States and Markets: The Advantage of an Early Start," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 347-369, December.
    2. Olsson, Ola & Hibbs, Douglas Jr., 2005. "Biogeography and long-run economic development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 909-938, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hernando Zuleta, 2012. "Seasonal Fluctuations And Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 1-27, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural Productivity; State Effectiveness; Institutional Quality;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:jed:journl:v:31:y:2006:i:2:p:73-90. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sung Y. Park). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/eccaukr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.