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Smuggling As Another Cause Of Failure Of The Ppp

Author

Listed:
  • Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)

  • Gour G. Goswami

    (Department of Economics, The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)

Abstract

In theoretical literature, smuggling is considered as a factor contributing to the deviation of the PPP-based exchange rates from the equilibrium exchange rates with little empirical support. In this paper, we used panel data for 33 developing countries over the period 1982-1995 and used panel unit root and panel cointegration technique along with pooled OLS, fixed effects, random effects, and Parks estimator in an augmented Balassa-Samuelson framework. Using two different proxies for smuggling it is found that smuggling into a country leads to an appreciation of domestic currency that can be considered as another cause of loosing competitiveness by many developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Gour G. Goswami, 2003. "Smuggling As Another Cause Of Failure Of The Ppp," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 23-38, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:jed:journl:v:28:y:2003:i:2:p:23-38
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Martin, Lawrence & Panagariya, Arvind, 1984. "Smuggling, trade, and price disparity: A crime-theoretic approach," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3-4), pages 201-217, November.
    5. Cebula, Richard, 1996. "An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Government Tax and Auditing Policies on the Size of the Underground Economy: The Case of the United States, 1973-94," MPRA Paper 49810, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen & Miteza, Ilir & Nasir, A. B. M., 2002. "The long-run relation between black market and official exchange rates: evidence from panel cointegration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 397-404, August.
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    11. DeLoach, Stephen B, 2001. "More Evidence in Favor of the Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 336-342, May.
    12. Edwards, Sebastian, 1988. "Real and monetary determinants of real exchange rate behavior: Theory and evidence from developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 311-341, November.
    13. Drine, I. & Rault, Ch., 2004. "Does the Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis Hold for Asian Countries?. An Empirical Analysis using Panel Data and Cointegration Tests," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(4).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Smuggling; PPP; Real Exchange Rate; Panel Data; Panel Unit Root; Panel Cointegration; LDCs;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

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