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FDIs and investment policy in some European countries after their EU accession. Challenges during the crisis

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  • Magdalena RADULESCU

    () (University of Pitesti, ROMANIA)

  • Elena Nolica DRUICA

    () (University of Bucharest, ROMANIA)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to find out to what extent the accession countries will be able to benefit from an increase in the quality of foreign direct investments (FDIs) that they receive due to EU membership. Although there will be some investment in new affiliates resulting in greenfield subsidiaries, transnational companies (TNCs) may divest their operations in response to better location advantages elsewhere in the EU (as Spain and Portugal are experiencing because their low-cost advantages are eroded). In many Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries, the share of foreign ownership in total capital stock is already typically much higher than in older EU member states, but we can already observe a trend of relocating TNCs’ subsidiaries to other emerging countries in order to diminish the costs, in the context of the present crisis and we believe that this trend will continue in the future, especially in the crisis context when the inceptive burden is heavy for governments. The conclusion of this paper is that the CEE countries haven’t faced quite similar conditions as the Southern European countries that acceded to the EU in the ‘80s. So, their benefits have considerably diminished and the present crisis didn’t help them at all to reduce their economic gaps comparing to the developed European countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Magdalena RADULESCU & Elena Nolica DRUICA, 2011. "FDIs and investment policy in some European countries after their EU accession. Challenges during the crisis," Romanian Journal of Economics, Institute of National Economy, vol. 33(2(42)), pages 169-183, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ine:journl:v:2:y:2011:i:42:p:169-183
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christian Bellak & Rajneesh Narula, 2008. "EU enlargement and consequences for FDI assisted industrial development," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2008-69, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    2. Ángel Gavilán & Pablo Hernández de Cos & Juan F. Jimeno & Juan A. Rojas, 2011. "Fiscal policy, structural reforms and external imbalances: a quantitative evaluation for Spain," Working Papers 1107, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    3. Bellak, Christian & Leibrecht, Markus & Riedl, Aleksandra, 2008. "Labour costs and FDI flows into Central and Eastern European Countries: A survey of the literature and empirical evidence," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 17-37, March.
    4. Timothy Goodspeed & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & JLi Zhang, 2006. "Are Government Policies More Important Than Taxation in Attracting FDI," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0614, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vasile Alecsandru STRAT, 2015. "The relationship between the education system and the inflows of FDI for the Central and East European EU new member states," Romanian Journal of Economics, Institute of National Economy, vol. 41(2(50)), pages 76-92, december.
    2. Lenuta Carp, 2012. "The Impact of FDI on the labor market in Central and Eastern Europe during the international crisis," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 3(1), pages 43-54, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    FDIs; Central and Eastern European countries; EU accession; investment policy; crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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