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Estimating structural macroeconomic shocks through long-run recursive restrictions on vector autoregressive models: the problem of identification

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  • Mark P. Taylor

    (Department of Economics, University of Warwick, and Centre for Economic Policy Research, UK)

Abstract

We demonstrate that a popular method of estimating underlying structural macroeconomic shocks and their impulse-response functions through recursive long-run structural restrictions on a vector autoregressive representation is not uniquely identified. We show, however, that it may be possible to infer additional qualitative restrictions to achieve identification. We illustrate with two applied examples, corresponding to a simple aggregate supply-aggregate demand framework for the USA and to a stochastic Mundell-Fleming-Dornbusch framework for the USA and Japan. The second example also illustrates how over-identifying restrictions of the underlying framework may be examined informally. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark P. Taylor, 2004. "Estimating structural macroeconomic shocks through long-run recursive restrictions on vector autoregressive models: the problem of identification," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(3), pages 229-244.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijf:ijfiec:v:9:y:2004:i:3:p:229-244
    DOI: 10.1002/ijfe.247
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard Clarida & Jordi Gali, 1994. "Sources of real exchange rate fluctuations: how important are nominal shocks?," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Apr.
    2. Bayoumi, Tamim & Taylor, Mark P, 1995. "Macro-economic Shocks, the ERM, and Tri-polarity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 321-331, May.
    3. David Hendry & Maozu Lu & Grayham E. Mizon, 2001. "Model Identification and Non-unique Structure," Economics Papers 2002-W10, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    4. Granger, Clive W.J., 2001. "Overview Of Nonlinear Macroeconometric Empirical Models," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(04), pages 466-481, September.
    5. Matthew Shapiro & Mark Watson, 1988. "Sources of Business Cycles Fluctuations," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1988, Volume 3, pages 111-156 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ahmed, Shaghil & Ickes, Barry W. & Ping Wang & Byung Sam Yoo, 1993. "International Business Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 335-359, June.
    7. repec:cup:macdyn:v:5:y:2001:i:4:p:466-81 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Lothian, James R. & Taylor, Mark P., 1997. "Real exchange rate behavior," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 945-954, December.
    9. Kilian, Lutz, 2001. "Impulse Response Analysis in Vector Autoregressions with Unknown Lag Order," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 161-179, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard H. Clarida & Mark P. Taylor, 2003. "Nonlinear Permanent - Temporary Decompositions in Macroeconomics and Finance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages 125-139, March.
    2. Annika Alexius & Erik Post, 2008. "Exchange rates and asymmetric shocks in small open economies," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 527-541, November.
    3. Ronayne, David, 2011. "Which Impulse Response Function?," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 971, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    4. Helmut Lütkepohl, 2013. "Reducing confidence bands for simulated impulse responses," Statistical Papers, Springer, vol. 54(4), pages 1131-1145, November.
    5. Ossama Mikhail, 2005. "What Happens After A Technology Shock? A Bayesian Perspective," Macroeconomics 0510016, EconWPA.
    6. Lutz Kilian, 2013. "Structural vector autoregressions," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Empirical Macroeconomics, chapter 22, pages 515-554 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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