IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ids/ijpubp/v12y2016i1-2p71-97.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Determining the ideological orientation of terrorist organisations: the effects of government repression and organised crime

Author

Listed:
  • Kjell Hausken
  • Dipak K. Gupta

Abstract

The paper develops a model about the coalition between terrorism and crime. An organisation can get funded by a benefactor which enables focusing on terrorist objectives, or funded by criminal mercenaries which decrease the terrorist organisation's ideological purity. We show how a balance is struck between these two concerns. We support empirically the two hypotheses that terrorist organisations' ideological orientation depends positively on steady funding by a benefactor and on the government's ability to impose sanctions on their activities. Otherwise terrorist organisations transform into criminal organisations. A terrorist organisation altruistically provides public goods for the community. A criminal organisation, however, provides private goods for itself. We offer examples of organisations retaining their terrorist ideology, and organisations transforming into criminal organisations.

Suggested Citation

  • Kjell Hausken & Dipak K. Gupta, 2016. "Determining the ideological orientation of terrorist organisations: the effects of government repression and organised crime," International Journal of Public Policy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 12(1/2), pages 71-97.
  • Handle: RePEc:ids:ijpubp:v:12:y:2016:i:1/2:p:71-97
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.inderscience.com/link.php?id=75229
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Varese, Federico, 2005. "The Russian Mafia: Private Protection in a New Market Economy," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279494.
    2. Berman, Eli & Laitin, David D., 2008. "Religion, terrorism and public goods: Testing the club model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(10-11), pages 1942-1967, October.
    3. Victor Asal & R. Karl Rethemeyer, 2008. "Dilettantes, Ideologues, and the Weak: Terrorists Who Don't Kill," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 25(3), pages 244-263, July.
    4. Jeremy M. Weinstein, 2005. "Resources and the Information Problem in Rebel Recruitment," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 49(4), pages 598-624, August.
    5. Burcu Savun & Brian J. Phillips, 2009. "Democracy, Foreign Policy, and Terrorism," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 53(6), pages 878-904, December.
    6. S. Blomberg & Khusrav Gaibulloev & Todd Sandler, 2011. "Terrorist group survival: ideology, tactics, and base of operations," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 441-463, December.
    7. repec:cup:apsrev:v:77:y:1983:i:01:p:36-54_24 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Kjell Hausken & Sheheryar Banuri & Dipak Gupta & Klaus Abbink, 2015. "Al Qaeda at the bar: coordinating ideologues and mercenaries in terrorist organizations," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 164(1), pages 57-73, July.
    9. Eli Berman, 2003. "Hamas, Taliban and the Jewish Underground: An Economist's View of Radical Religious Militias," NBER Working Papers 10004, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Eli Berman & David Laitin, 2005. "Hard Targets: Theory and Evidence on Suicide Attacks," NBER Working Papers 11740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ids:ijpubp:v:12:y:2016:i:1/2:p:71-97. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Carmel O'Grady). General contact details of provider: http://www.inderscience.com/browse/index.php?journalID=97 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.