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Are resource abundant countries afflicted by the resource curse?

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  • Wizarat, Shahida

Abstract

We find evidence for the ‘resource curse’ phenomenon for the decade of the 1980s only, as revealed by higher average annual rate of GDP growth for the resource scarce countries as compared with the top oil and gas exporting countries and ore and mineral rich countries. The low growth rate prediction of the resource curse literature is refuted as the average annual rate of growth of ore and mineral rich countries is higher, while that of the top oil and gas exporting countries much higher as compared with the resource scarce countries for the 1990 and 2000 decades.

Suggested Citation

  • Wizarat, Shahida, 2013. "Are resource abundant countries afflicted by the resource curse?," International Journal of Development and Conflict, Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, vol. 3(2), pages 24-39.
  • Handle: RePEc:gok:ijdcv1:v:3:y:2013:i:2:p:24-39
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Resource Curse; Dutch Disease; Global GDP Growth Rates; Resource Rich Countries; Resource Scarce Countries;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • Q34 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Natural Resources and Domestic and International Conflicts
    • Y10 - Miscellaneous Categories - - Data: Tables and Charts - - - Data: Tables and Charts

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