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Resolving Stack Effect Problems in a High-Rise Office Building by Mechanical Pressurization

Author

Listed:
  • Jung-yeon Yu

    () (Department of Architectural Engineering, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea)

  • Kyoo-dong Song

    () (Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering, Hanyang University, ERICA Campus, Ansan, Gyeonggi-Do 15588, Korea)

  • Dong-woo Cho

    () (Korea Institute of Civil Engineering & Building Technology, 283 Goyangdae-Ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 10223, Korea)

Abstract

In high-rise buildings, the stack effect causes various problems, especially problems related to excessive pressure differences across main entrance doors and elevator doors, particularly in heating seasons. To reduce the stack effect, this study aims to find effective operation schemes for the HVAC systems in a 60-story commercial building, located in Seoul, Korea. Field measurements were conducted to identify the problems related to the stack effect in the building. Computer simulations were conducted to examine the effectiveness of various HVAC operation schemes in reducing the stack effect. Then, an optimum and effective operation scheme was adopted from the computer simulation results and applied in the field. The adopted scheme was used to pressurize the upper zone of the building. Through field application and an adjustment process, a proper amount of air volume was found to effectively pressurize the upper zone of this building, solving the problems related to the stack effect. The required air volume for pressurization was maintained in the building by reducing the volume of the exhaust air (EA) while maintaining a constant volume of outdoor air (OA).

Suggested Citation

  • Jung-yeon Yu & Kyoo-dong Song & Dong-woo Cho, 2017. "Resolving Stack Effect Problems in a High-Rise Office Building by Mechanical Pressurization," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(10), pages 1-17, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1731-:d:113306
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Oropeza-Perez, Ivan & Østergaard, Poul Alberg, 2014. "Energy saving potential of utilizing natural ventilation under warm conditions – A case study of Mexico," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 20-32.
    2. Tong, Zheming & Chen, Yujiao & Malkawi, Ali, 2017. "Estimating natural ventilation potential for high-rise buildings considering boundary layer meteorology," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 193(C), pages 276-286.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    stack effect; high-rise buildings; mechanical pressurization; HVAC operation schemes;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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