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Regional Sustainability, Individual Expectations and Work Motivation: A Multilevel Analysis

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  • Adriana Ana Maria Davidescu

    () (Department of Statistics and Econometrics, Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romana Square, 15-17 Dorobanți St., Sector 1, 010552 Bucharest, Romania
    Labour Market Policies Department, National Scientific Research Institute for Labour and Social Protection, 6-8, Povernei Street, 010643 Bucharest, Romania)

  • Monica Roman

    () (Department of Statistics and Econometrics, Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romana Square, 15-17 Dorobanți St., Sector 1, 010552 Bucharest, Romania
    Institute for the Study of Labor IZA, Schaumburg-Lippe-Str. 5-9, Bonn, Germany)

  • Vasile Alecsandru Strat

    () (Department of Statistics and Econometrics, Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romana Square, 15-17 Dorobanți St., Sector 1, 010552 Bucharest, Romania)

  • Mihaela Mosora

    () (Department of Economics, Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romana Square, 15-17 Dorobanți St., Sector 1, 010552 Bucharest, Romania)

Abstract

In the context of the recent labor shortages in Eastern European countries, Romania included, companies, organizations and decision makers need to strongly address the issue of labor motivation for increasing worker performance and also for attracting the scarce labor resources. The main goal of the research is to explore new determinants of work motivation, such as regional sustainability and also individual factors related to individual expectations. Therefore, the responsive methodology used for this purpose implies a multilevel econometric modelling, in which the first level regards individuals, and the second one consists in development regions. Moreover, the role of individual factors is tested using Vroom’s theory of expectations and filling a gap in the existing literature on work motivation in developing, post-communist economies. The main findings prove that one dimension of sustainability, namely social sustainability has a significant impact on work motivation, alongside with four dimensions of individual factors. Economic and environmental sustainability have no significant impact on work motivation in the case of Romanian workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Adriana Ana Maria Davidescu & Monica Roman & Vasile Alecsandru Strat & Mihaela Mosora, 2019. "Regional Sustainability, Individual Expectations and Work Motivation: A Multilevel Analysis," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(12), pages 1-23, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:12:p:3331-:d:240342
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Durrant, Gabriele B. & Steele, Fiona, 2009. "Multilevel modelling of refusal and non-contact in household surveys: evidence from six UK Government surveys," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 50112, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    6. Dumitrescu Luigi & Stanciu Oana & Tichindelean Mihai & Vinerean Simona, 2013. "Achieving Employee Satisfaction By Pursuing Sustainable Practices," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 8(1), pages 36-45, April.
    7. Fataciune (Badalan), Nicoleta & Matei, Lucica, 2011. "The Fundaments of Applying the Concept of Public Service Motivation in the South-Eastern European States," Apas Papers 395, Academic Public Administration Studies Archive - APAS.
    8. Elisha Temminck & Kathryn Mearns & Laura Fruhen, 2015. "Motivating Employees towards Sustainable Behaviour," Business Strategy and the Environment, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(6), pages 402-412, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rafael Ninno Muniz & Stéfano Frizzo Stefenon & William Gouvêa Buratto & Ademir Nied & Luiz Henrique Meyer & Erlon Cristian Finardi & Ricardo Marino Kühl & José Alberto Silva de Sá & Brigida Ramati Per, 2020. "Tools for Measuring Energy Sustainability: A Comparative Review," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(9), pages 1-27, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    sustainability; regional development; work motivation; labor market; multilevel analysis; Romania;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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