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Associations between Public Transit Usage and Bikesharing Behaviors in The United States

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  • Yuanyuan Zhang

    (School of Management, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China
    Stern School of Business, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA)

  • Yuming Zhang

    (School of Management, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China)

Abstract

Public bikesharing systems have rapidly expanded across many cities in the United States (US). Previous studies in the literature found that, in general, bikesharing is associated with public transit ridership. However, the interdependencies between public transit usage and bikesharing behaviors have been mixed and have not been fully understood. Therefore, the objective of this research is to examine the associations between the frequency of public transit usage and the probability and frequency of bikesharing usage in the US using data from the 2017 National Household Travel Survey. The respondents were asked how many times they had used public transit and bikesharing in the last 30 days. Zero-inflated negative binomial regression models were conducted to assess the associations between the frequency of public transit usage and the probability and frequency of bikesharing usage. The results show that, in general, a one-unit increase in the frequency of public transit usage is significantly associated with a 4.0% increase in the probability of bikesharing usage and a 1.4% increase in the frequency of bikesharing usage. The significantly positive relationship between the frequency of public transit usage and the frequency of bikesharing usage is more pronounced among those living in areas with higher population density or with rail service. The empirical results demonstrate that public transit usage is significantly positively associated with bikesharing usage, and suggest policy implications that improving public transit usage tends to increase the usage of bikesharing. This study also provides significant empirical evidence for the formulation of interventions and policies targeting to promote integrated transportation systems that support multimodal transportation and mutually sustainable transport networks.

Suggested Citation

  • Yuanyuan Zhang & Yuming Zhang, 2018. "Associations between Public Transit Usage and Bikesharing Behaviors in The United States," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(6), pages 1-20, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:6:p:1868-:d:150543
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    Cited by:

    1. Xinwei Ma & Yanjie Ji & Yuchuan Jin & Jianbiao Wang & Mingjia He, 2018. "Modeling the Factors Influencing the Activity Spaces of Bikeshare around Metro Stations: A Spatial Regression Model," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(11), pages 1-12, October.
    2. Schimohr, Katja & Scheiner, Joachim, 2021. "Spatial and temporal analysis of bike-sharing use in Cologne taking into account a public transit disruption," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 92(C).
    3. Caggiani, Leonardo & Colovic, Aleksandra & Ottomanelli, Michele, 2020. "An equality-based model for bike-sharing stations location in bicycle-public transport multimodal mobility," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 251-265.
    4. Link, Christoph & Strasser, Christoph & Hinterreiter, Michael, 2020. "Free-floating bikesharing in Vienna – A user behaviour analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 168-182.

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