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Natural Resources and Productivity: Can Banking Development Mitigate the Curse?

Author

Listed:
  • Ramez Abubakr Badeeb

    () (School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800, Malaysia)

  • Hooi Hooi Lean

    () (School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800, Malaysia)

Abstract

This paper contributes to the literature concerning the natural resource curse by exploring the role of banking development in reducing the resource curse in a natural resource-based country, Yemen. Using time series data over the period 1980–2012, we find that natural resource dependence is negatively related to productivity, and this relationship depends on the level of banking development. Increasing this level reduces the negative consequences of the natural resource curse. Therefore, policymakers should proactively encourage credit to enable the banking sector to play a more efficient intermediary role in mobilizing domestic savings and channeling them to productive investments. This will help to accumulate permanent productive wealth to enhance any diversification effort and compensate for the decline in natural resource production.

Suggested Citation

  • Ramez Abubakr Badeeb & Hooi Hooi Lean, 2017. "Natural Resources and Productivity: Can Banking Development Mitigate the Curse?," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(2), pages 1-14, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jecomi:v:5:y:2017:i:2:p:11-:d:95100
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Halvor Mehlum & Karl Moene & Ragnar Torvik, 2006. "Institutions and the Resource Curse," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(508), pages 1-20, January.
    2. Tarlok Singh, 2008. "Financial development and economic growth nexus: a time-series evidence from India," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(12), pages 1615-1627.
    3. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Lean, Hooi Hooi, 2012. "Does financial development increase energy consumption? The role of industrialization and urbanization in Tunisia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 473-479.
    4. Badeeb, Ramez Abubakr & Lean, Hooi Hooi & Smyth, Russell, 2016. "Oil curse and finance–growth nexus in Malaysia: The role of investment," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 154-165.
    5. Corden, W M, 1984. "Booming Sector and Dutch Disease Economics: Survey and Consolidation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(3), pages 359-380, November.
    6. Sachs, Jeffrey D. & Warner, Andrew M., 2001. "The curse of natural resources," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 827-838, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    natural resource curse; banking development; productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • E - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics
    • F - International Economics
    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics
    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics

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