IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jagris/v3y2013i3p579-595d28898.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Identification of Multiple Subtypes of Campylobacter jejuni in Chicken Meat and the Impact on Source Attribution

Author

Listed:
  • Megan L. Devane

    () (Institute of Environmental Science and Research Limited, Christchurch Science Centre, P.O. Box 29-181, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand)

  • Brent J. Gilpin

    () (Institute of Environmental Science and Research Limited, Christchurch Science Centre, P.O. Box 29-181, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand)

  • Beth Robson

    () (Institute of Environmental Science and Research Limited, Christchurch Science Centre, P.O. Box 29-181, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand)

  • John D. Klena

    () (University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
    Current address: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Emerging Infectious Diseases, Beijing 100000, China)

  • Marion G. Savill

    (Institute of Environmental Science and Research Limited, Christchurch Science Centre, P.O. Box 29-181, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
    Current address: Affordable Water Limited, 72 Argyle Street, Herne Bay, Auckland 1011, New Zealand)

  • John A. Hudson

    () (Institute of Environmental Science and Research Limited, Christchurch Science Centre, P.O. Box 29-181, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand)

Abstract

Most source attribution studies for Campylobacter use subtyping data based on single isolates from foods and environmental sources in an attempt to draw epidemiological inferences. It has been suggested that subtyping only one Campylobacter isolate per chicken carcass incurs a risk of failing to recognise the presence of clinically relevant, but numerically infrequent, subtypes. To investigate this, between 21 and 25 Campylobacter jejuni isolates from each of ten retail chicken carcasses were subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the two restriction enzymes Sma I and Kpn I. Among the 227 isolates, thirteen subtypes were identified, the most frequently occurring subtype being isolated from three carcasses. Six carcasses carried a single subtype, three carcasses carried two subtypes each and one carcass carried three subtypes. Some subtypes carried by an individual carcass were shown to be potentially clonally related. Comparison of C. jejuni subtypes from chickens with isolate subtypes from human clinical cases ( n = 1248) revealed seven of the thirteen chicken subtypes were indistinguishable from human cases. None of the numerically minor chicken subtypes were identified in the human data. Therefore, typing only one Campylobacter isolate from individual chicken carcasses may be adequate to inform Campylobacter source attribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Megan L. Devane & Brent J. Gilpin & Beth Robson & John D. Klena & Marion G. Savill & John A. Hudson, 2013. "Identification of Multiple Subtypes of Campylobacter jejuni in Chicken Meat and the Impact on Source Attribution," Agriculture, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(3), pages 1-17, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jagris:v:3:y:2013:i:3:p:579-595:d:28898
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2077-0472/3/3/579/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2077-0472/3/3/579/
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. World Bank & Food and Agriculture Organization & International Fund for Agricultural Development, 2009. "Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook
      [Agricultura y desarrollo rural : manual sobre género en agricultura]
      ," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6603, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    multiple subtypes; chicken carcass; diversity; enrichment; C. jejuni;

    JEL classification:

    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture
    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • Q14 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Finance
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jagris:v:3:y:2013:i:3:p:579-595:d:28898. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team). General contact details of provider: http://www.mdpi.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.