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Taking the pulse of the New York City economy

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Abstract

Although New York City's payroll employment is rising briskly, it still falls short of its 2001 peak, raising concerns that the local economy is not generating enough jobs. However, a look at a broader set of economic indicators-alternative job measures, wage and salary earnings, and a composite index of economic activity-suggests that the economy is significantly healthier than the payroll count indicates. Indeed, a measure of employment among New York City residents shows a strong upward trend extending over the past thirty years. Subseries: Second District Highlights.

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  • Jason Bram & James A. Orr, 2006. "Taking the pulse of the New York City economy," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 12(May).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednci:y:2006:i:may:n:v.12no.4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jason Bram & James A. Orr, 1999. "Can New York City bank on Wall Street?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 5(Jul).
    2. Erica L. Groshen & Simon M. Potter & Rebecca J. Sela, 2004. "Economic restructuring in New York State," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 10(Jun).
    3. James A. Orr & Robert W. Rich & Rae D. Rosen, 1999. "Two new indexes offer a broad view of economic activity in the New York - New Jersey region," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 5(Oct).
    4. Jason Bram & James A. Orr & Carol Rapaport, 2002. "Measuring the effects of the September 11 attack on New York City," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 8(Nov), pages 5-20.
    5. Jason Bram & Alisdair McKay, 2005. "Evolution of commuting patterns in the New York City metro area," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 11(Oct).
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    1. Richard Vogel & W. Hubert Keen, 2010. "Public Higher Education and New York State’s Economy," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 24(4), pages 384-393, November.
    2. Bram Jason & Haughwout Andrew & Orr James, 2009. "Further Observations on the Economic Effects on New York City of the Attack on the World Trade Center," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 1-24, July.
    3. Werling Jeffrey & Horst Ronald, 2009. "Macroeconomic and Industry Impacts of 9/11: An Interindustry Macroeconomic Approach," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 1-32, July.

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