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Reserve accumulation: implications for global capital flows and financial markets

  • Matthew Higgins
  • Thomas Klitgaard

Many central banks-particularly those in Japan and the emerging Asian nations-have been building up their holdings of foreign currency assets. These holdings, known as foreign exchange reserves, may help countries stabilize their currencies, but they can also lead to investment losses for the central banks. The large share of dollar assets among reserve holdings has made foreign central banks important players in U.S. financial markets.

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Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its journal Current Issues in Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 10 (2004)
Issue (Month): Sep ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fednci:y:2004:i:sep:n:v.10no.10
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  1. Kenneth Kletzer & Mark Spiegel, 1996. "Speculative capital inflows and exchange rate targeting in the Pacific Basin," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 96-05, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  2. Christian B. Mulder & Matthieu Bussière, 1999. "External Vulnerability in Emerging Market Economies; How High Liquidity Can offset Weak Fundamentals and the Effects of Contagion," IMF Working Papers 99/88, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Matthew Higgins & Thomas Klitgaard, 1998. "Viewing the current account deficit as a capital inflow," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 4(Dec).
  4. Dorothy Meadow Sobol, 1998. "Foreign ownership of U.S. Treasury securities: what the data show and do not show," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 4(May).
  5. Michael P. Dooley & David Folkerts-Landau & Peter Garber, 2004. "The revived Bretton Woods system," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 307-313.
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