IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fip/fedker/y2011iqivp55-80nv.96no.4.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

What should banks be allowed to do?

Author

Listed:
  • Charles S. Morris

Abstract

The health of the U.S. economy is heavily dependent on the health of the banking system. Commercial banks support economic activity through a number of traditional services-taking deposits, making loans, and providing payment services. Many of today's large banking organizations, however, don't look much like traditional banks. Morris examines how the financial structure has changed over the years and resulted in more complex banking organizations that combine traditional banking and nonbank activities. The increased complexity may have also increased their risk. Increased risk, in turn, can endanger financial stability and the health of the economy, putting the public safety net and taxpayers at greater risk. One possible option to reduce costs and risks to the financial system and public safety net is to restrict some of the nontraditional activities that have become permissible for banking organizations in recent years.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles S. Morris, 2011. "What should banks be allowed to do?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 96(Q IV), pages 55-80.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2011:i:qiv:p:55-80:n:v.96no.4
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.kansascityfed.org/documents/938/2011-What%20Should%20Banks%20Be%20Allowed%20to%20Do%3F.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Thomas M. Hoenig & Charles S. Morris, 2013. "Restructuring the Banking System to Improve Safety and Soundness," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Viral V Acharya & Thorsten Beck & Douglas D Evanoff & George G Kaufman & Richard Portes (ed.), The Social Value of the Financial Sector Too Big to Fail or Just Too Big?, chapter 21, pages 401-425, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    2. repec:ces:ifodic:v:8:y:2010:i:2:p:14566986 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. White, Eugene Nelson, 1986. "Before the Glass-Steagall Act: An analysis of the investment banking activities of national banks," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 33-55, January.
    4. Kroszner, Randall S & Rajan, Raghuram G, 1994. "Is the Glass-Steagall Act Justified? A Study of the U.S. Experience with Universal Banking before 1933," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 810-832, September.
    5. Martin Hellwig, 2010. "Capital Regulation after the Crisis: Business as Usual?," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 8(02), pages 40-46, July.
    6. Donald P. Morgan, 2002. "Rating Banks: Risk and Uncertainty in an Opaque Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 874-888, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Luttrell & Harvey Rosenblum & Jackson Thies, 2012. "Understanding the risks inherent in shadow banking: a primer and practical lessons learned," Staff Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Nov.
    2. Yin, Haiyan, 2021. "The impact of competition and bank market regulation on banks’ cost efficiency," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Dafna Avraham & Patricia Selvaggi & James Vickery, 2012. "A Structural view of U.S. bank holding companies," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 07, pages 65-81.
    2. Howard Bodenhorn, 2016. "Two Centuries of Finance and Growth in the United States, 1790-1980," Working Papers id:11352, eSocialSciences.
    3. Abbassi, Puriya & Iyer, Rajkamal & Peydró, José-Luis & Soto, Paul, 2020. "Stressed Banks? Evidence from the Largest-Ever Supervisory Review," EconStor Preprints 217048, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    4. Nicholas Crafts & Peter Fearon, 2010. "Lessons from the 1930s Great Depression," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(3), pages 285-317, Autumn.
    5. Thomas M. Hoenig & Charles S. Morris, 2013. "Restructuring the Banking System to Improve Safety and Soundness," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Viral V Acharya & Thorsten Beck & Douglas D Evanoff & George G Kaufman & Richard Portes (ed.), The Social Value of the Financial Sector Too Big to Fail or Just Too Big?, chapter 21, pages 401-425, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    6. Stefano Battilossi, 2009. "Did governance fail universal banks? Moral hazard, risk taking, and banking crises in interwar Italy1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(s1), pages 101-134, August.
    7. Asher A. Blass & Richard S. Grossman, 1998. "Who Needs Glass‐Steagall? Evidence From Israel'S Bank Shares Crisis And The Great Depression," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(2), pages 185-196, April.
    8. Albrecht Ritschl, 2012. "War 2008 das neue 1929? Richtige und falsche Vergleiche zwischen der Großen Depression der 1930er Jahre und der Großen Rezession von 2008," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 13, pages 36-57, May.
    9. Donato Masciandaro & Mattia Suardi, 2014. "Public interest and lobbies in reforming banking regulation: three tales of ring fencing," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 61(4), pages 305-328, December.
    10. James R. Barth & Gerard Caprio Jr. & Ross Levine, 2002. "Financial Regulation and Performance: Cross-COuntry Evidence," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.),Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 4, pages 113-142, Central Bank of Chile.
    11. Colvin, Christopher L. & de Jong, Abe & Fliers, Philip T., 2015. "Predicting the past: Understanding the causes of bank distress in the Netherlands in the 1920s," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 97-121.
    12. Arnoud W. A. Boot & Lev Ratnovski, 2016. "Banking and Trading," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 20(6), pages 2219-2246.
    13. Kroszner, Randall S. & Rajan, Raghuram G., 1997. "Organization structure and credibility: Evidence from commercial bank securities activities before the Glass-Steagall Act," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 475-516, August.
    14. Delis, Manthos D. & Kim, Suk-Joong & Politsidis, Panagiotis N. & Wu, Eliza, 2021. "Regulators vs. markets: Are lending terms influenced by different perceptions of bank risk?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    15. L.Paige Fields & Donald R. Fraser, 2004. "Effects of IPO mispricing on the risk and reputational capital of commercial banks," Review of Financial Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 13(1-2), pages 65-77.
    16. Neal, Larry & White, Eugene N., 2012. "The Glass–Steagall Act in historical perspective," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 104-113.
    17. Laeven, Luc & Levine, Ross, 2007. "Is there a diversification discount in financial conglomerates?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 331-367, August.
    18. Al-Jarhi, Mabid Ali, 2005. "The Case For Universal Banking As A Component Of Islamic Banking," Islamic Economic Studies, The Islamic Research and Training Institute (IRTI), vol. 13, pages 2-65.
    19. Fohlin, Caroline, 1999. "Universal Banking in Pre-World War I Germany: Model or Myth?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 305-343, October.
    20. Delis, Manthos & Kim, Suk-Joong & Politsidis, Panagiotis & Wu, Eliza, 2020. "Regulators vs. markets: Do differences in their bank risk perceptions affect lending terms?," MPRA Paper 98548, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banks and banking;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2011:i:qiv:p:55-80:n:v.96no.4. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbkcus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Lu Dayrit (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbkcus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.