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A guide to aggregate house price measures

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  • Jordan Rappaport

Abstract

In recent years, the United States, like many other industrialized nations, has experienced wide swings in the growth rate of housing prices. To understand the behavior of housing prices and their influence on the economy, it is crucial to have an accurate measure of aggregate housing prices. In practice, however, it is difficult to develop such a measure. Analysts rely on three approaches to measure the aggregate price of housing. The first methodology simply averages all observed prices. The second looks at repeat sales of the same property. The third treats a house as a bundle of attributes, each with its own price that changes over time. ; Rappaport provides an overview of the three methodologies for pricing housing and a detailed guide to the major house price indexes used by housing analysts. The analysis suggests there is no one ?best? measure of housing prices. Each of the three methodologies has conceptual advantages and disadvantages, and the empirical house price indexes have practical advantages and disadvantages as well. Which is best depends on the question being addressed.

Suggested Citation

  • Jordan Rappaport, 2007. "A guide to aggregate house price measures," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 92(Q II), pages 41-71.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2007:i:qii:p:41-71:n:v.92no.2
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    File URL: http://www.kansascityfed.org/PUBLICAT/ECONREV/PDF/2q07rapp.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joe Peek & James A. Wilcox, 1991. "The Measurement and Determinants of Single‐Family House Prices," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 19(3), pages 353-382, September.
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    3. Harding, John P. & Rosenthal, Stuart S. & Sirmans, C.F., 2007. "Depreciation of housing capital, maintenance, and house price inflation: Estimates from a repeat sales model," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 193-217, March.
    4. Case, Bradford & Pollakowski, Henry O & Wachter, Susan M, 1997. "Frequency of Transaction and House Price Modeling," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1-2), pages 173-187, Jan.-Marc.
    5. Jerry T. Ferguson, 1988. "After-Sale Evaluations: Appraisals or Justifications?," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 3(1), pages 19-26.
    6. Min Hwang & John M. Quigley, 2004. "Selectivity, Quality Adjustment and Mean Reversion in the Measurement of House Values," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 28(2_3), pages 161-178, March.
    7. Gatzlaff, Dean H & Haurin, Donald R, 1997. "Sample Selection Bias and Repeat-Sales Index Estimates," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1-2), pages 33-50, Jan.-Marc.
    8. Jesse M. Abraham & William S. Schauman, 1991. "New Evidence on Home Prices from Freddie Mac Repeat Sales," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 19(3), pages 333-352, September.
    9. Meese, Richard A & Wallace, Nancy E, 1997. "The Construction of Residential Housing Price Indices: A Comparison of Repeat-Sales, Hedonic-Regression and Hybrid Approaches," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1-2), pages 51-73, Jan.-Marc.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. A house divided against itself cannot stand : Explaining the composition effect in housing prices
      by ? in FRED blog on 2020-02-24 14:00:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniele Bianchi & Massimo Guidolin & Francesco Ravazzolo, 2018. "Dissecting the 2007–2009 Real Estate Market Bust: Systematic Pricing Correction or Just a Housing Fad?," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 16(1), pages 34-62.
    2. Barry Bosworth & Rosanna Smart, 2009. "The Wealth of Older Americans and the Sub-Prime Debacle The Wealth of Older Americans and the Sub-Prime Debacle," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2009-21, Center for Retirement Research, revised Nov 2009.
    3. Michael A. Flor & Torben Klarl, 2015. "On the Cyclicity of Regional House Prices: New Evidence for U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas," CESifo Working Paper Series 5471, CESifo.
    4. Dorsey, Robert E. & Hu, Haixin & Mayer, Walter J. & Wang, Hui-chen, 2010. "Hedonic versus repeat-sales housing price indexes for measuring the recent boom-bust cycle," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 75-93, June.
    5. Kelly D. Edmiston & Roger Zalneraitis, 2007. "Rising foreclosures in the United States: a perfect storm," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 92(Q IV), pages 115-145.
    6. Kelly D. Edmiston, 2009. "Characteristics of high foreclosure neighborhoods in the Tenth District," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 94(Q II), pages 51-75.
    7. Karen Fierro & Thomas Fullerton & K. Donjuan-Callejo, 2009. "Housing Attribute Preferences in a Northern Mexico Metropolitan Economy," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(2), pages 159-172, June.
    8. Flor, Michael A. & Klarl, Torben, 2017. "On the cyclicity of regional house prices: New evidence for U.S. metropolitan statistical areas," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 134-156.

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    Keywords

    Housing - Prices;

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