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Economic factors, monetary policy and expected returns on stocks and bonds

Author

Listed:
  • James R. Booth
  • Lena Chua Booth

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of the stance of monetary policy on security returns. The two measures of the stance of monetary policy used, the federal funds rate and an index based on the changes in the discount rate, contain significant information that can be used to forecast expected stock and bond portfolio returns. Specifically, we find that a restrictive (expansive) monetary policy stance decreases (increases) returns of large and small stock portfolios and in some cases, corporate bond portfolios. The monetary policy stance measures have explanatory power in forecasting stock and bond returns, beyond the business conditions proxies.

Suggested Citation

  • James R. Booth & Lena Chua Booth, 1997. "Economic factors, monetary policy and expected returns on stocks and bonds," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 32-42.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfer:y:1997:p:32-42:n:2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kaul, Gautam, 1987. "Stock returns and inflation : The role of the monetary sector," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 253-276, June.
    2. Waud, Roger N, 1970. "Public Interpretation of Federal Reserve Discount Rate Changes: Evidence on the 'Announcement Effect'," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 38(2), pages 231-250, March.
    3. Keim, Donald B. & Stambaugh, Robert F., 1986. "Predicting returns in the stock and bond markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 357-390, December.
    4. Robert J. Shiller, 1984. "Stock Prices and Social Dynamics," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 15(2), pages 457-510.
    5. Bernanke, Ben S & Blinder, Alan S, 1992. "The Federal Funds Rate and the Channels of Monetary Transmission," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 901-921, September.
    6. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 1989. "Does Monetary Policy Matter? A New Test in the Spirit of Friedman and Schwartz," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1989, Volume 4, pages 121-184 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Fama, Eugene F, 1981. "Stock Returns, Real Activity, Inflation, and Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(4), pages 545-565, September.
    8. Campbell, John Y., 1987. "Stock returns and the term structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 373-399, June.
    9. Geske, Robert & Roll, Richard, 1983. " The Fiscal and Monetary Linkage between Stock Returns and Inflation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 38(1), pages 1-33, March.
    10. Schwert, G William, 1990. " Stock Returns and Real Activity: A Century of Evidence," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1237-1257, September.
    11. Banz, Rolf W., 1981. "The relationship between return and market value of common stocks," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 3-18, March.
    12. Romer, Christina D. & Romer, David H., 1994. "Monetary policy matters," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 75-88, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jensen, Gerald R. & Mercer, Jeffrey M., 2006. "Security markets and the information content of monetary policy turning points," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 477-494, September.
    2. Clive Coetzee, 2002. "Monetary Conditions and Stock Returns: A South African Case Study," Finance 0205002, EconWPA.
    3. Lee, Ki Seong & Yoon, Seok, 2007. "Interrelationships and volatility of the financial asset prices under capital flows: The case of Korea," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 386-397, May.
    4. John, Tatom, 2009. "U.S. Monetary Policy and Stock Prices: Should the Fed Attempt to Control Stock Prices?," MPRA Paper 19762, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Jensen, Gerald R. & Moorman, Theodore, 2010. "Inter-temporal variation in the illiquidity premium," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 338-358, November.
    6. Tori, Cynthia Royal, 2001. "Federal Open Market Committee meetings and stock market performance," Financial Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(1-4), pages 163-171.
    7. Ioannidis, Christos & Kontonikas, Alexandros, 2008. "The impact of monetary policy on stock prices," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 33-53.

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