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Algorithmic Approaches to Game-theoretical Modeling and Simulation

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Abstract

This paper deals with a methodology of computer modeling and simulation of market competitive situations using game theory. The situations are thematically focused mostly to models of commodity markets but the applications of the methodology can be wider. This methodology covers the whole modeling work, including a primary specification of a problem, making an abstract model, making a simulation model, design of a state space of the problem and the simulator itself. As a whole, the methodology represents a complete framework for implementation of computer models of commodity markets suitable for their further analysis and prediction of their future evolution. The main contribution of the paper consists in the algorithmic implementation of computer processing of large strategic game.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Hrubý, 2008. "Algorithmic Approaches to Game-theoretical Modeling and Simulation," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 2(3), pages 268-300, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:aucocz:au2008_268
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Green, Kesten C., 2002. "Forecasting decisions in conflict situations: a comparison of game theory, role-playing, and unaided judgement," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 321-344.
    2. Aumann, Robert J., 1974. "Subjectivity and correlation in randomized strategies," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 67-96, March.
    3. Krishna, Vijay, 2009. "Auction Theory," Elsevier Monographs, Elsevier, edition 2, number 9780123745071, December.
    4. Erev, Ido & Roth, Alvin E. & Slonim, Robert L. & Barron, Greg, 2002. "Predictive value and the usefulness of game theoretic models," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 359-368.
    5. Martin J. Osborne & Ariel Rubinstein, 1994. "A Course in Game Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262650401.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Hrubý & Petr Čambala & Jan Toufar, 2010. "Game-Theoretic Modeling of Electricity Markets in Central Europe," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 4(1), pages 032-061, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Market models; non-cooperative game theory; modeling and simulation; artificial intelligence;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games

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