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How technology transfer really occurs on the factory floor: a case of a major Japanese automotive die manufacturer in the United States

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  • Sunaoshi, Yukako
  • Kotabe, Masaaki
  • Murray, Janet Y.

Abstract

Global competition requires increased technology transfer across national boundaries for global business opportunities. Previous studies on technology transfer have assumed that both transferor and transferee possess linguistic competence, and mainly focused on the types and the nature of the technology transferred. When examining international technology transfer between linguistically and culturally very different countries, companies face additional challenges. Through a different theoretical lens in organizational learning, we contribute to the literature on knowledge transfer by proposing and confirming demonstrability and drawability as two new constructs that affect knowledge transfer.

Suggested Citation

  • Sunaoshi, Yukako & Kotabe, Masaaki & Murray, Janet Y., 2005. "How technology transfer really occurs on the factory floor: a case of a major Japanese automotive die manufacturer in the United States," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 57-70, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:worbus:v:40:y:2005:i:1:p:57-70
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Niosi, Jorge & Hanel, Petr & Fiset, Liette, 1995. "Technology transfer to developing countries through engineering firms: The Canadian experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(10), pages 1815-1824, October.
    2. Wang, Jian-Ye & Blomstrom, Magnus, 1992. "Foreign investment and technology transfer : A simple model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 137-155, January.
    3. Mansfield, Edwin, 1975. "International Technology Transfer: Forms, Resource Requirements, and Policies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(2), pages 372-376, May.
    4. Bruce Kogut & Udo Zander, 1993. "Knowledge of the Firm and the Evolutionary Theory of the Multinational Corporation," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 24(4), pages 625-645, December.
    5. Robert Grosse, 1996. "International Technology Transfer in Services," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 27(4), pages 781-800, December.
    6. Eric von Hippel, 1994. ""Sticky Information" and the Locus of Problem Solving: Implications for Innovation," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 40(4), pages 429-439, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andersson, Ulf & Dasí, Àngels & Mudambi, Ram & Pedersen, Torben, 2016. "Technology, innovation and knowledge: The importance of ideas and international connectivity," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 153-162.
    2. Tippmann, Esther & Sharkey Scott, Pamela & Mangematin, Vincent, 2014. "Subsidiary managers’ knowledge mobilizations: Unpacking emergent knowledge flows," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 431-443.
    3. Peltokorpi, Vesa, 2015. "Corporate Language Proficiency and Reverse Knowledge Transfer in Multinational Corporations: Interactive Effects of Communication Media Richness and Commitment to Headquarters," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 49-62.
    4. Michailova, Snejina & Mustaffa, Zaidah, 2012. "Subsidiary knowledge flows in multinational corporations: Research accomplishments, gaps, and opportunities," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 383-396.
    5. Rabbiosi, Larissa & Santangelo, Grazia D., 2013. "Parent company benefits from reverse knowledge transfer: The role of the liability of newness in MNEs," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 160-170.
    6. Björkman, Anette & Piekkari, Rebecca, 2009. "Language and foreign subsidiary control: An empirical test," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 105-117, March.
    7. Mathew Manimala & K. Thomas, 2013. "Learning Needs of Technology Transfer: Coping with Discontinuities and Disruptions," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 4(4), pages 511-539, December.
    8. repec:hal:gemwpa:hal-00864324 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Schomaker, Margaret Spring & Zaheer, Srilata, 2014. "The Role of Language in Knowledge Transfer to Geographically Dispersed Manufacturing Operations," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 55-72.

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