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Women’s Access to Labor Market Opportunities, Control of Household Resources, and Domestic Violence: Evidence from Bangladesh

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  • Heath, Rachel

Abstract

While there are many positive societal implications of increased female labor force participation, working may increase a woman’s risk of domestic violence. Using data I collected from Bangladesh, I document a positive correlation between work and domestic violence, but only among women with low education or young age at marriage. These results suggest that women with low bargaining power face increased risk of domestic violence upon entering the labor force as their husbands seek to counteract their increased bargaining power. Consequently, policies that increase women’s baseline bargaining power will decrease the risk that they face domestic violence upon beginning work.

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  • Heath, Rachel, 2014. "Women’s Access to Labor Market Opportunities, Control of Household Resources, and Domestic Violence: Evidence from Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 32-46.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:57:y:2014:i:c:p:32-46
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.10.028
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    Cited by:

    1. Supriya Garikipati & Susan Johnson & Isabelle Guérin & Ariane Szafarz, 2017. "Microfinance and Gender: Issues, Challenges and The Road Ahead," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(5), pages 641-648, May.
    2. Italo A. Gutierrez & Jose V. Gallegos, 2016. "The Effect of Civil Conflict on Domestic Violence The Case of Peru," Working Papers WR-1168, RAND Corporation.
    3. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:2:p:229-261 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Anukriti, S & Dasgupta, Shatanjaya, 2017. "Marriage Markets in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 10556, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Suwastika Naidu, 2016. "Does Human Development Influence Women’s Labour Force Participation Rate? Evidences from the Fiji Islands," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 1067-1084, July.
    6. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:30:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1057_s41287-017-0119-y is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ana Tur-Prats, 2017. "Unemployment and intimate-partner violence: A gender-identity approach," Economics Working Papers 1564, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    8. repec:eee:wdevel:v:95:y:2017:i:c:p:211-230 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Victoire Girard, 2016. "Mandated political representation and crimes against the low castes," WIDER Working Paper Series 074, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    10. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:1017-1031 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:socmed:v:196:y:2018:i:c:p:150-157 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Tranchant, Jean-Pierre & Mueller, Catherine, 2017. "Gendered Experience of Interpersonal Violence in Urban and Rural Spaces: The Case of Ghana," MPRA Paper 79533, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Selim Gulesci, 2017. "Forced migration and attitudes towards domestic violence: Evidence from Turkey," WIDER Working Paper Series 110, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. La Mattina, Giulia, 2017. "Civil conflict, domestic violence and intra-household bargaining in post-genocide Rwanda," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 168-198.
    15. Ana Tur-Prats, 2017. "Unemployment and intimate-partner violence: A gender-identity approach," Working Papers 963, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    16. Neetu A. John & Kirsten Stoebenau & Samantha Ritter & Jeffrey Edmeades & Nikola Balvin & UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti, 2017. "Gender Socialization during Adolescence in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Conceptualization, influences and outcomes," Papers indipa885, Innocenti Discussion Papers.

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