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Remittances and Portfolio Values: An Inquiry using Immigrants from Africa, Europe, and the Americas

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  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina
  • Pozo, Susan

Abstract

Using a recent Spanish database, we show that remittances respond to cross-country differences in portfolio values, behavior consistent with immigrant’s access to trans-national networks. Responsiveness to portfolio variables is found to persist regardless of education level. There are, however, differences in the portfolio variables to which immigrants respond, as we would expect given migrants’ diverse backgrounds, region of origin, and motive for emigrating. Remitting patterns are found to change with the length of migration spells suggestive that remittances sent for portfolio motives become more likely as the immediate needs of home family are addressed and asset accumulation becomes more important.

Suggested Citation

  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Pozo, Susan, 2013. "Remittances and Portfolio Values: An Inquiry using Immigrants from Africa, Europe, and the Americas," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 83-95.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:41:y:2013:i:c:p:83-95
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2012.05.036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Mazzolari, Francesca, 2010. "Remittances to Latin America from migrants in the United States: Assessing the impact of amnesty programs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 323-335, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti, 2016. "Steady streams and sudden bursts: persistence patterns in remittance decisions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 263-292, January.
    2. Kosse, Anneke & Vermeulen, Robert, 2014. "Migrants’ Choice of Remittance Channel: Do General Payment Habits Play a Role?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 213-227.
    3. repec:taf:jbemgt:v:17:y:2016:i:6:p:992-1006 is not listed on IDEAS

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