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Can Entrepreneurial Activity be Taught? Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Central America

  • Klinger, Bailey
  • Schündeln, Matthias
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    Summary Business training is a widely used development tool, yet little is known about its impact. We study the effects of such a business training program held in Central America. To deal with endogenous selection into the training program, we use a regression discontinuity design, exploiting the fact that a fixed number of applicants are taken into the training program based on a pre-training score. Business training significantly increases the probability that an applicant to the workshop starts a business or expands an existing business. Results also suggest gender heterogeneity as well as the presence of financial constraints.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305750X1100091X
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 39 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 9 (September)
    Pages: 1592-1610

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:9:p:1592-1610
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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