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The challenges of transport PPP's in low-income developing countries: A case study of Bangladesh

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  • Gordon, Cameron

Abstract

Public–Private Partnerships (PPP) in transport are a growing phenomenon throughout the world. The developing world in particular has seen a veritable explosion of such arrangements. There can be, however, a significant difference between developing countries that are ‘low-income’ versus those that are middle-income. In some ways low-income countries can benefit more from the access to new capital and technical expertise that a PPP can bring. On the other hand there can be significant barriers to implementation of PPP's in low-income nations and equity issues can loom especially large there. This paper examines these differences by way of a case study of the country of Bangladesh. The paper concludes with a discussion of preliminary ‘lessons learned’ in bringing transport PPP's to low-income countries.

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  • Gordon, Cameron, 2012. "The challenges of transport PPP's in low-income developing countries: A case study of Bangladesh," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 296-301.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:24:y:2012:i:c:p:296-301 DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2012.06.014
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