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An exploration of the importance of social influence in the decision to start bicycling in England

Author

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  • Sherwin, Henrietta
  • Chatterjee, Kiron
  • Jain, Juliet

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding, through qualitative exploration, of the ways in which social influence affects the decision to start bicycling in England. ‘Social influence’ is defined as the process by which an individual’s thoughts and actions are changed by the thoughts and action of others. Its role was investigated at three levels: the immediate family, household members and significant others (direct social influence); the extended family, friends, peers and colleagues (less direct social influence); and the wider cultural context (indirect social influence). Interviews with 61 individuals living in 12 towns and cities across England were analysed. Half of the interviewees were new regular bicyclists and the other half did not bicycle at all, or only occasionally. Social influence was found to be the dominant factor for a minority of the cases where participants started bicycling regularly. It played a role alongside other factors in other cases. It could take the form of direct influence from family, friends and peers or indirect influence from the social and cultural context. The analysis illustrates the difficulty of capturing social influence which is often hidden and emerges incidentally in the course of the interviews and interacts with other contributing factors. The role of social influence found in this research challenges the rational approach to explaining travel decision making that has traditionally dominated transport studies. The paper suggests that social processes could be harnessed to improve the efficacy of bicycling promotion programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Sherwin, Henrietta & Chatterjee, Kiron & Jain, Juliet, 2014. "An exploration of the importance of social influence in the decision to start bicycling in England," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 32-45.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:68:y:2014:i:c:p:32-45
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2014.05.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Downward, Paul & Rasciute, Simona, 2015. "Assessing the impact of the National Cycle Network and physical activity lifestyle on cycling behaviour in England," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 425-437.
    2. Aldred, Rachel & Woodcock, James, 2015. "Reframing safety: An analysis of perceptions of cycle safety clothing," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 103-112.
    3. Kroesen, Maarten, 2015. "Do partners influence each other’s travel patterns? A new approach to study the role of social norms," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 489-505.
    4. Maness, Michael & Cirillo, Cinzia, 2016. "An indirect latent informational conformity social influence choice model: Formulation and case study," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 93(PA), pages 75-101.
    5. repec:eee:eejocm:v:25:y:2017:i:c:p:50-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:retrec:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:2-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Wei, Fangfang & Jia, Ning & Ma, Shoufeng, 2016. "Day-to-day traffic dynamics considering social interaction: From individual route choice behavior to a network flow model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 335-354.
    8. repec:eee:jotrge:v:46:y:2015:i:c:p:137-150 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s11116-016-9715-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:eee:jotrge:v:72:y:2018:i:c:p:94-105 is not listed on IDEAS

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