IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Determinants of adoption of Internet in Africa: Case of 17 sub-Saharan countries


  • Birba, Ousmane
  • Diagne, Abdoulaye


This study develops two-level hierarchical model that identifies factors that favor or hamper the use of Internet in Africa. We used data from a survey covering 17 African countries. Our results confirm that urbanization and the spread of Internet infrastructures play an important role in individual decisions to adopt this technology. They also reveal that an individual will have a larger probability to use Internet if he/she has at least completed primary education.

Suggested Citation

  • Birba, Ousmane & Diagne, Abdoulaye, 2012. "Determinants of adoption of Internet in Africa: Case of 17 sub-Saharan countries," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 463-472.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:23:y:2012:i:4:p:463-472 DOI: 10.1016/j.strueco.2012.06.003

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Menzie D. Chinn & Robert W. Fairlie, 2007. "The determinants of the global digital divide: a cross-country analysis of computer and internet penetration," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(1), pages 16-44, January.
    2. Goolsbee, Austan & Klenow, Peter J, 2002. "Evidence on Learning and Network Externalities in the Diffusion of Home Computers," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 317-343, October.
    3. Forman, Christopher, 2002. "The Corporate Digital Divide: Determinants of Internet Adoption," WIDER Working Paper Series 089, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Oyelaran-Oyeyinka, Banji & Lal, Kaushalesh, 2003. "The Internet Diffusion in Sub-Saharan Africa: A cross-country Analysis," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 5, United Nations University - INTECH.
    5. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 1995. "Africa's growth tragedy : a retrospective, 1960-89," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1503, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Simone CASCHILI & Francesca MEDDA, 2015. "The Port Attractiveness Index:Application On African Ports," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 41, pages 47-82.
    2. Feng, Guangchao Charles, 2015. "Determinants of Internet diffusion: A focus on China," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 176-185.

    More about this item


    Internet adoption; Hierarchical models; Africa;


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:23:y:2012:i:4:p:463-472. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.