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AIDS treatment and mental health: Evidence from Uganda

Listed author(s):
  • Okeke, Edward N.
  • Wagner, Glenn J.
Registered author(s):

    Increased access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in developing countries over the last decade is believed to have contributed to reductions in HIV transmission and improvements in life expectancy. While numerous studies document the effects of ART on physical health and functioning, comparatively less attention has been paid to the effects of ART on mental health outcomes. In this paper we study the impact of ART on depression in a cohort of patients in Uganda entering HIV care. We find that 12 months after beginning ART, the prevalence of major and minor depression in the treatment group had fallen by approximately 15 and 27 percentage points respectively relative to a comparison group of patients in HIV care but not receiving ART. We also find some evidence that ART helps to close the well-known gender gap in depression between men and women.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953613003006
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 92 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 27-34

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:92:y:2013:i:c:p:27-34
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.05.018
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    1. Brooke Grundfest Schoepf, 2003. "Uganda: lessons for aids control in Africa," Review of African Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(98), pages 553-572, December.
    2. Harsha Thirumurthy & Joshua Graff Zivin & Markus Goldstein, 2008. "The Economic Impact of AIDS Treatment: Labor Supply in Western Kenya," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 511-552.
    3. Falaris, Evangelos M., 2003. "The effect of survey attrition in longitudinal surveys: evidence from Peru, Cote d'Ivoire and Vietnam," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 133-157, February.
    4. Becketti, Sean, et al, 1988. "The Panel Study of Income Dynamics after Fourteen Years: An Evaluatio n," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(4), pages 472-492, October.
    5. Alan D. Lopez & Colin D. Mathers & Majid Ezzati & Dean T. Jamison & Christopher J. L. Murray, 2006. "Global Burden of Disease and Risk Factors," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7039, April.
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