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Inequality and the association between involuntary job loss and depressive symptoms

Author

Listed:
  • Berchick, Edward R.
  • Gallo, William T.
  • Maralani, Vida
  • Kasl, Stanislav V.

Abstract

Although socioeconomic status (SES) has been to shown to be associated with susceptibility to involuntary job loss as well as with health, the ways in which individual SES indicators may moderate the job loss-health association remain underexplored. Using data from the Americans' Changing Lives study, we estimate the ways in which the association between job loss and depressive symptoms depends on five aspects of SES: education, income, occupational prestige, wealth, and homeownership. Our findings indicate that higher SES prior to job loss is not uniformly associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Higher education and lower prestige appear to buffer the health impacts of job loss, while financial indicators do not. These results have a number of implications for understanding the multidimensional role that social inequality plays in shaping the health effects of job loss.

Suggested Citation

  • Berchick, Edward R. & Gallo, William T. & Maralani, Vida & Kasl, Stanislav V., 2012. "Inequality and the association between involuntary job loss and depressive symptoms," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1891-1894.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:10:p:1891-1894
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.07.024
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2004:94:1:82-88_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Lynch, J. W. & Kaplan, G. A. & Salonen, J. T., 1997. "Why do poor people behave poorly? Variation in adult health behaviours and psychosocial characteristics by stages of the socioeconomic lifecourse," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 44(6), pages 809-819, March.
    3. McDonough, Peggy & Amick, Benjamin C., 2001. "The social context of health selection: a longitudinal study of health and employment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 135-145, July.
    4. Burgard, Sarah A. & Brand, Jennie E. & House, James S., 2009. "Perceived job insecurity and worker health in the United States," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 777-785, September.
    5. Strully, Kate, 2009. "Racial-ethnic disparities in health and the labor market: Losing and leaving jobs," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 768-776, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Diana Frasquilho & Margarida Gaspar Matos & Adilson Marques & Tânia Gaspar & José Miguel Caldas-de-Almeida, 2016. "Distress and unemployment: the related economic and noneconomic factors in a sample of unemployed adults," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(7), pages 821-828, September.
    2. Schaan, Barbara, 2014. "The interaction of family background and personal education on depressive symptoms in later life," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 94-102.
    3. Schneider, William & Waldfogel, Jane & Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, 2017. "The Great Recession and risk for child abuse and neglect," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 71-81.
    4. repec:hur:ijarbs:v:7:y:2017:i:6:p:326-341 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Gebel, Michael & Voßemer, Jonas, 2014. "The impact of employment transitions on health in Germany. A difference-in-differences propensity score matching approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 128-136.

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