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A life-cycle approach to the analysis of the relationship between social capital and health in Britain

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  • Borgonovi, Francesca
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    I examine to what extent social capital can promote individual well-being in the form of good physical and mental health. Our analysis is based on multiple waves of data from the National Child Development Survey and the British Cohort Study, two large cohort studies following the lives of children who were born in Britain in one particular week in 1958 and 1970. I use waves that are comparable across the surveys in childhood and adulthood to explore the association between aspects of social capital and several measures of health when adopting a life-cycle approach. The findings suggest that individuals with high levels of social capital generally fare better than individuals with lower levels of social capital and that such associations are robust to the inclusion of controls such as physical and mental health in childhood and circumstances of the family of origin.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277-9536(10)00667-2
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 71 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 11 (December)
    Pages: 1927-1934

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:71:y:2010:i:11:p:1927-1934
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    1. Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & John Rigg, 2004. "The Impact of Low-Income on Child Health: Evidence from a Birth Cohort Study," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 04/098, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. van Doorslaer, Eddy & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 2003. "Does inequality in self-assessed health predict inequality in survival by income? Evidence from Swedish data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(9), pages 1621-1629, November.
    3. Hall, Peter A., 1999. "Social Capital in Britain," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(03), pages 417-461, June.
    4. Almedom, Astier M., 2005. "Social capital and mental health: An interdisciplinary review of primary evidence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 943-964, September.
    5. Maria del Carmen Huerta & Francesca Borgonovi, 2010. "Education, Alcohol Use and Abuse Among Young Adults in Britain," OECD Education Working Papers 50, OECD Publishing.
    6. Franks, Peter & Gold, Marthe R. & Fiscella, Kevin, 2003. "Sociodemographics, self-rated health, and mortality in the US," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(12), pages 2505-2514, June.
    7. Poortinga, Wouter, 2006. "Social relations or social capital? Individual and community health effects of bonding social capital," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 255-270, July.
    8. Sundquist, Jan & Johansson, Sven-Erik & Yang, Min & Sundquist, Kristina, 2006. "Low linking social capital as a predictor of coronary heart disease in Sweden: A cohort study of 2.8 million people," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(4), pages 954-963, February.
    9. Snelgrove, John W. & Pikhart, Hynek & Stafford, Mai, 2009. "A multilevel analysis of social capital and self-rated health: Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(11), pages 1993-2001, June.
    10. McKinlay, John B., 1993. "The promotion of health through planned sociopolitical change: Challenges for research and policy," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 109-117, January.
    11. Huerta, Maria C. & Borgonovi, Francesca, 2010. "Education, alcohol use and abuse among young adults in Britain," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 143-151, July.
    12. Borgonovi, Francesca, 2008. "Doing well by doing good. The relationship between formal volunteering and self-reported health and happiness," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(11), pages 2321-2334, June.
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