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The effect of income and occupation on body mass index among women in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Surveys (1983-2002)

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  • Colchero, M. Arantxa
  • Caballero, Benjamin
  • Bishai, David

Abstract

We assessed the effects of changes in income and occupational activities on changes in body weight among 2952 non-pregnant women enrolled in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Surveys between 1983 and 2002. On average, body mass index (BMI) among women occupied in low activities was 0.29Â kg/m2 (standard error 0.11) larger compared to women occupied in heavy activities. BMI among women involved in medium activities was on average 0.12Â kg/m2 (standard error 0.05) larger compared to women occupied in heavy activities. A one-unit increase in log household income in the previous survey was associated with a small and positive change in BMI of 0.006Â kg/m2 (standard error 0.02) but the effect was not significant. The trend of increasing body mass was higher in the late 1980s than during the 1990s. These period effects were stronger for the women who were younger at baseline and for women with low or medium activity levels. Our analysis suggests a trend in the environment over the last 20 years that has increased the susceptibility of Filipino women to larger body mass.

Suggested Citation

  • Colchero, M. Arantxa & Caballero, Benjamin & Bishai, David, 2008. "The effect of income and occupation on body mass index among women in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Surveys (1983-2002)," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(9), pages 1967-1978, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:66:y:2008:i:9:p:1967-1978
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Inas Rashad & Michael Grossman & Shin-Yi Chou, 2006. "The Super Size of America: An Economic Estimation of Body Mass Index and Obesity in Adults," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 133-148, Winter.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mathilde Godard, 2017. "Gaining weight through retirement? Results from the SHARE survey," Working Papers halshs-01525000, HAL.
    2. Dang, Archana & Maitra, Pushkar & Menon, Nidhiya, 2017. "Labor Market Engagement and the Health of Working Adults: Evidence from India," IZA Discussion Papers 11118, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/11535 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Godard, Mathilde, 2016. "Gaining weight through retirement? Results from the SHARE survey," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 27-46.
    5. Colchero, M. Arantxa & Bishai, David, 2012. "Weight and earnings among childbearing women in Metropolitan Cebu, Philippines (1983–2002)," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 256-263.

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