IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/soceco/v27y1998i1p29-52.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The five careers of the biological metaphor in economic theory

Author

Listed:
  • Khalil, Elias L.

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Khalil, Elias L., 1998. "The five careers of the biological metaphor in economic theory," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 29-52.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:27:y:1998:i:1:p:29-52
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W5H-46V5W7C-2/2/2e5548adbd914d3eb141b6f34734dc1b
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Khalil, Elias L., 1995. "The socioculturalist agenda in economics: Critical remarks of Thorstein Veblen's legacy," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 545-569.
    2. Demsetz, Harold, 1996. "Rationality, Evolution, and Acquisitiveness," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(3), pages 484-495, July.
    3. Hodgson, Geoffrey M, 1994. "Optimisation and Evolution: Winter's Critique of Friedman Revisited," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(4), pages 413-430, August.
    4. Khalil, Elias L., 1990. "Entropy law and exhaustion of natural resources Is Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen's paradigm defensible?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 163-178, June.
    5. Allen, P. M. & McGlade, J. M., 1987. "Modelling complex human systems: A fisheries example," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 147-167, June.
    6. Armen A. Alchian, 1950. "Uncertainty, Evolution, and Economic Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58, pages 211-211.
    7. Becker, Gary S, 1976. "Altruism, Egoism, and Genetic Fitness: Economics and Sociobiology," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 817-826, September.
    8. Khalil, Elias L, 1997. "Is the Firm an Individual?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(4), pages 519-544, July.
    9. Dung, Tran Huu, 1992. "Consumption, production and technological progress: a unified entropic approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 195-210, December.
    10. Khalil, Elias L, 1996. "Non-linear Dynamics versus Development Processes: Two Kinds of Change," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 64(3), pages 309-322, September.
    11. Khalil, Elias L., 1990. "Beyond Self-Interest and Altruism: A Reconstruction of Adam Smith's Theory of Human Conduct," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(02), pages 255-273, October.
    12. Judson, D. H., 1989. "The convergence of neo-Ricardian and embodied energy theories of value and price," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 261-281, October.
    13. Sidney G. Winter, 1971. "Satisficing, Selection, and the Innovating Remnant," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 85(2), pages 237-261.
    14. Herbert A. Simon, 1991. "Organizations and Markets," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 25-44, Spring.
    15. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1977. "Economics from a Biological Viewpoint," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(1), pages 1-52, April.
    16. Herman E. Daly, 1968. "On Economics as a Life Science," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 76, pages 392-392.
    17. Buchanan, James M. & Vanberg, Viktor J., 1991. "The Market as a Creative Process," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(02), pages 167-186, October.
    18. Frank, Robert H, 1987. "If Homo Economicus Could Choose His Own Utility Function, Would He Want One with a Conscience?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 593-604, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Danny García Callejas, 2007. "Biology and Economics: Metaphors that Economists usually take from Biology," REVISTA ECOS DE ECONOMÍA, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT, March.
    2. João Rogério Sanson, 2007. "Ethics, politics, and Nonsatiation in Consumption: A Synthesis," Economia, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics], vol. 8(1), pages 1-20.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:27:y:1998:i:1:p:29-52. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.