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Persistence of various types of innovation analyzed and explained

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  • Tavassoli, Sam
  • Karlsson, Charlie

Abstract

This paper analyzes the persistency in innovation behavior of firms. Using five waves of the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced the innovative behavior of firms over a ten-year period, i.e., between 2002 and 2012. We distinguish between four types of innovations: process, product, marketing, and organizational innovations. First, using transition probability matrix, we found evidence of (unconditional) state dependence in all types of innovation, with product innovators having the strongest persistent behavior. Second, using a dynamic probit model, we found evidence of “true” state dependency among all types of innovations, except marketing innovators. Once again, the strongest persistency was found for product innovators.

Suggested Citation

  • Tavassoli, Sam & Karlsson, Charlie, 2015. "Persistence of various types of innovation analyzed and explained," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 1887-1901.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:44:y:2015:i:10:p:1887-1901
    DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2015.06.001
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sam Tavassoli & Lars Bengtsson & Charlie Karlsson, 2017. "Strategic entrepreneurship and knowledge spillovers: spatial and aspatial perspectives," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 233-249, March.
    2. repec:eee:techno:v:79:y:2019:i:c:p:35-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:spr:scient:v:115:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-018-2709-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:jbrese:v:91:y:2018:i:c:p:233-247 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:bla:presci:v:97:y:2018:i:4:p:931-955 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Charlie Karlsson & Sam Tavassoli, 2016. "Innovation strategies of firms: What strategies and why?," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(6), pages 1483-1506, December.
    7. repec:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:1:p:234-247 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:5:p:1171-1186 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Grillitsch, Markus & Schubert, Torben & Srholec, Martin, 2016. "Knowledge diversity and firm growth: Searching for a missing link," Papers in Innovation Studies 2016/13, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    10. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:2:p:379-389 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Schøtt, Thomas & Jensen, Kent Wickstrøm, 2016. "Firms’ innovation benefiting from networking and institutional support: A global analysis of national and firm effects," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 1233-1246.
    12. Schubert, Torben & Tavassoli, Sam, 2019. "Product Innovation and Educational Diversity in Top and Middle Management Teams," Papers in Innovation Studies 2019/3, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    13. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:8:p:1418-1436 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:eee:tefoso:v:127:y:2018:i:c:p:258-270 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:jes:journl:y:2017:v:8:p:25-43 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:6:p:1493-1512 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Sam Tavassoli & Charlie Karlsson, 2018. "The role of regional context on innovation persistency of firms," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 97(4), pages 931-955, November.
    18. Guarascio, Dario & Tamagni, Federico, 2019. "Persistence of innovation and patterns of firm growth," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(6), pages 1493-1512.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Persistence; Innovation; Product innovations; Process innovations; Marketing innovations; Organizational innovations; State dependence; Heterogeneity; Firms; Community Innovation Survey;

    JEL classification:

    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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